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Latest Dinosaurs Stories

Feathered Dinosaurs May Have Been The Norm
2012-07-03 09:47:57

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online One of the most complete dinosaur fossils ever discovered suggests that feathered dinosaurs were more prevalent than previously thought and could have been the norm, not the exception. The 150 million-year-old fossil found in northern Bavaria shows that the dinosaur had down-like feathers over parts of its front and back as well on its tail. Scientists dubbed the creature Sciurumimus albersdoerferi after "Scirius”, the scientific...

Dinosaurs May Not Have Been Cold-Blooded After All
2012-06-28 10:13:58

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online A new study, published Wednesday in the journal Nature, suggests that dinosaurs were warm-blooded creatures, not cold-blooded reptiles as previously thought. According to BBC News Science and Technology Reporter Jason Palmer, researchers have disproven one of the primary bits of evidence supporting the four-decade-old theory that dinosaurs were cold blooded. That evidence, skeletal markings on the creatures' bones known as...

2012-06-21 11:10:35

Cutting Edge Technology and Hands-On Activities bring these Big, Bizarre, and Brand-New Dinos to Life Forget about the dinosaurs you know— prepare for a whole new breed of beast! On June 23, 2012, the Royal Ontario Museum (ROM) launches the world premiere of Ultimate Dinosaurs: Giants from Gondwana, presented by Raymond James Ltd., one of North America´s leading full-service investment dealers. In this original exhibition curated, designed, and produced by the ROM, some of the...

Some Dinosaurs Were Already Dying Out Before Asteroid Impact
2012-05-02 04:49:27

Lawrence LeBlond for RedOrbit.com [ Watch the Video ] An asteroid impact may have ended the reign of the dinosaurs here on Earth about 65 million years ago, but new evidence suggests many of the large, plant-eating dinosaurs were already dying out during the last 12 million years of the Cretaceous period. The findings, by an international team of US and German scientists, do not dispute the mass extinction that killed off all the dinosaurs at the end of the Cretaceous era. They do,...

2012-03-29 14:43:43

The dinosaurs of the Cretaceous may have faced an unexpected hazard: fire! In a paper published online today, researchers from Royal Holloway University of London and The Field Museum of Natural History in Chicago have shown that during the Cretaceous (145-65 million years ago) fire was much more widespread than previously thought. The researchers traced fire activity in the fossil record through the occurrence of charcoal deposits, compiling a global database for this time interval....

Image 1 - Killer Claws Help Provide New Theory On Evolution Of Flight
2011-12-16 03:57:20

New research from Montana State University's Museum of the Rockies has revealed how dinosaurs like Velociraptor and Deinonychus used their famous killer claws, leading to a new hypothesis on the evolution of flight in birds. In a paper published Dec. 14 in PLoS ONE, MSU researchers Denver W. Fowler, Elizabeth A. Freedman, John B. Scannella and Robert E. Kambic (now at Brown University in Rhode Island), describe how comparing modern birds of prey helped develop a new behavior model for...

Princeton Model Shows Fallout Of Giant Meteorite Strike
2011-10-20 04:50:33

Seeking to better understand the level of death and destruction that would result from a large meteorite striking the Earth, Princeton University researchers have developed a new model that can not only more accurately simulate the seismic fallout of such an impact, but also help reveal new information about the surface and interior of planets based on past collisions. Princeton researchers created the first model to take into account Earth's elliptical shape, surface features and ocean...

Image 1 - Worms Among First Animals To Appear After Asteroid Impact
2011-10-11 12:21:28

University of Colorado researchers have found that worms were among the first animals to surface after an asteroid plowed into the Gulf of Mexico 65.5 million years ago. Geological sciences Associate Professor Karen Chin of the university said this "K-T extinction" is often focused on the survival and proliferation of mammals, and studies show some of the earliest terrestrial ecosystems to emerge were aquatic plants. However, new evidence from North Dakota shows networks of...

Image 1 - Study Finds 'Clear Evidence' Meteorite Wiped Out Primitive Birds
2011-09-20 06:10:58

  The same meteorite impact that caused dinosaurs to go extinct 65 million years ago also essentially wiped out ancient birds, a team of paleontologists claim in a new study. The researchers, led by Nicholas Longrich of Yale University, studied collections of approximately two dozen bird fossils of various species from the school's Peabody Museum of Natural History, as well as from the American Museum of Natural History, the University of California Museum of Paleontology, and the...

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2011-07-28 04:55:00

Archaeopteryx, once believed to be the world's earliest bird, may actually have been just another feathered dinosaur, according to a report published Wednesday in the journal Nature. Researchers in China, led by Xing Xu of Linyi University, carried out a phylogenetic analysis combining a newly discovered fossil with other similar dinosaurs and early birds, and concluded that the species should no longer be considered a fully developed bird. If confirmed, the controversial hypothesis would be...


Latest Dinosaurs Reference Libraries

2014-04-22 14:47:42

John Harold Ostrom (February 18, 1928 – July 16, 2005) was an American Paleontologist who was greatly influential in the revival of scientific research on Dinosaurs. He is best known for demonstrating that Dinosaurs were less like contemporary reptiles but more closely related to large, flightless birds like the ostrich – a theory that holds its ground in the paleontological community to this day. John Ostrom was born and raised in Schenectady, New York. His father was a physician, and...

Robert Thomas Bakker
2014-04-22 14:27:45

Robert Thomas Bakker (born March 24, 1945) is an American Paleontologist known for his contribution to the “Dinosaur Renaissance” and his support of his mentor Ostrom’s theory that some dinosaurs were warm-blooded. He specializes in the ecological context and behavior of dinosaurs. Bakker was born in Bergen County, New Jersey. As a young boy, he developed an interest in dinosaurs following his first trip to the dinosaur exhibit at the American Museum of Natural History – he was...

Ornithology
2013-10-09 12:32:30

Ornithology, a branch of zoology, is the study of birds. The term ornithology is derived from the ancient Greek words for bird and rationale or explanation. This study differs from other sciences because amateurs often take part in studies and because birds are commonly seen. It is thought that ornithology developed in the same manner than biology developed. Drawings from the Stone Age show the earliest interest in birds and the remains of over eighty bird species have been found at excavated...

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Word of the Day
call-note
  • The call or cry of a bird or other animal to its mate or its young.
'Call-note' is newer than 'bird-call,' which originally referred to 'an instrument for imitating the note of birds' but now also refers to 'the song or cry of a bird.'
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