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Latest DISC1 Stories

2014-04-01 13:11:34

Johns Hopkins researchers say that an experimental anticancer compound appears to have reversed behaviors associated with schizophrenia and restored some lost brain cell function in adolescent mice with a rodent version of the devastating mental illness. The drug is one of a class of compounds known as PAK inhibitors, which have been shown in animal experiments to confer some protection from brain damage due to Fragile X syndrome, an inherited disease in humans marked by mental...

2012-07-17 12:01:40

Johns Hopkins researchers say they have discovered a cause-and-effect relationship between two well-established biological risk factors for schizophrenia previously believed to be independent of one another. The findings could eventually lead researchers to develop better drugs to treat the cognitive dysfunction associated with schizophrenia and possibly other mental illnesses. Researchers have long studied the role played in the brain's neurons by the Disrupted-in-Schizophrenia 1...

2012-03-27 10:40:08

Human genome and mouse studies identify new precise genetic links Working with genetically engineered mice and the genomes of thousands of people with schizophrenia, researchers at Johns Hopkins say they now better understand how both nature and nurture can affect one's risks for schizophrenia and abnormal brain development in general. The researchers reported in the March 2 issue of Cell that defects in a schizophrenia-risk genes and environmental stress right after birth together can...

2011-12-29 06:30:35

(Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Carrying single DNA letter changes from two different genes together may increase the risk of developing schizophrenia, according to this study. Causes for psychiatric diseases like schizophrenia and autism have been difficult to pinpoint, since they may be triggered by many small genetic changes that alone may be insufficient, but in the right combination may cause disease. Drastic DNA rearrangements in the genetic letters of the DISC1 gene are known to cause...

2011-11-23 12:10:47

Although many mental illnesses are uniquely human, animals sometimes exhibit abnormal behaviors similar to those seen in humans with psychological disorders. Such behaviors are called endophenotypes. Now, researchers at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) have found that mice lacking a gene that encodes a particular protein found in the synapses of the brain display a number of endophenotypes associated with schizophrenia and autism spectrum disorders. The new findings appear...

2011-11-17 10:57:59

Significant progress has been made in understanding the genetic risk factors underlying psychiatric disease. Recent studies have identified common genetic mutations conferring modest risk and rare variants comprising significant risk. One example of a rare cause of psychiatric disorders is the Disrupted in Schizophrenia-1 (DISC1) gene, first identified in a large Scottish pedigree displaying schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and depression. Common variants in DISC1 have been associated with...

2011-04-06 23:04:59

An international team of scientists lead by researchers from Duke University and Johns Hopkins University have discovered a key "switch" in the brain that allows neurons to stop dividing so that these cells can migrate toward their final destinations in the brain. The finding may be relevant to making early identification of people who go on to develop schizophrenia and other brain disorders. "This work sheds light on what has been a big black box in neuroscience," said Nicholas Katsanis,...

2011-04-06 23:03:12

Johns Hopkins researchers report the discovery of a molecular switch that regulates the behavior of a protein that, when altered, is already known to increase human susceptibility to schizophrenia and mood disorders. The findings, published online in the journal Nature, expand the possibility of creating biomarkers that can better diagnose those with mental illnesses and track their treatment. Building on previous studies at Hopkins, the new research further offers clues to why the Disrupted...

2010-07-15 02:43:36

Scientists are making progress towards a better understanding of the neuropathology associated with debilitating psychiatric illnesses like bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. New research, published by Cell Press in the July 15 issue of the journal Neuron, reveals mechanisms that connect a known psychiatric risk gene to disruptions in brain cell proliferation and migration during development. A research group led by Dr. Li-Huei Tsai from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology had recently...

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2010-02-26 09:48:29

Brain differences caused by known schizophrenia gene may explain late development of classic symptoms In reports of two new studies, researchers led by Johns Hopkins say they have identified the mechanisms rooted in two anatomical brain abnormalities that may explain the onset of schizophrenia and the reason symptoms don't develop until young adulthood. Both types of anatomical glitches are influenced by a gene known as DISC1, whose mutant form was first identified in a Scottish family with a...


Word of the Day
omphalos
  • The navel or umbilicus.
  • In Greek archaeology: A central boss, as on a shield, a bowl, etc.
  • A sacred stone in the temple of Apollo at Delphi, believed by the Greeks to mark the 'navel' or exact center-point of the earth.
'Omphalos' comes from the ancient Greek.
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