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Latest Dislocation Stories

2012-12-17 14:24:54

Rice University theory predicts formation of conductive sub-nano ℠wires´ in two-dimensional materials A new material structure predicted at Rice University offers the tantalizing possibility of a signal path smaller than the nanowires for advanced electronics now under development at Rice and elsewhere. Theoretical physicist Boris Yakobson and postdoctoral fellow Xiaolong Zou were investigating the atomic-scale properties of two-dimensional materials when they found to their...

2010-11-26 12:09:37

Materials scientists from Case Western Reserve University and the Institute of Solid State Research in Jlich, Germany have produced particularly clear changes in the atomic structure of sapphire following deformation at high temperatures. Peering through an electron microscope down to a level where a human hair would seem as wide as a washer and dryer set, they were able to quantify deviations from the regular columns of aluminum and oxygen atoms - the stuff of perfect sapphire crystals. The...

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2010-04-23 12:40:00

Scientists take first step toward controlling the growth of nanomaterials without catalysts Researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison recently made a significant first step toward understanding how to control the growth of the nanotubes, nanowires and nanorods needed for renewable energy and other technology applications. These nanocrystalline materials, or nanomaterials, possess unique chemical and physical properties that can be used in solar energy panels, high energy density...

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2010-04-07 13:25:04

Materials scientists have known that a metal's strength (or weakness) is governed by dislocation interactions, a messy exchange of intersecting fault lines that move or ripple within metallic crystals. But what happens when metals are engineered at the nanoscale? Is there a way to make metals stronger and more ductile by manipulating their nanostructures? Brown University scientists may have figured out a way. In a paper published in Nature, Huajian Gao and researchers from the University of...

2010-03-01 17:40:00

Study Shows Majority of Injuries Occur During Sports and Recreational Activity ROSEMONT, Ill., March 1 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- The shoulder joint is the most mobile joint in the body and consequently one of the most commonly dislocated joints. An article published in the March 2010 issue of The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery (JBJS) reveals that the majority of all shoulder dislocations occur during sports activities and young males are at a higher risk. The study also shows a high...

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2009-06-17 14:40:00

Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have discovered that a reduction in mechanical strain at the boundaries of crystal grains can significantly improve the performance of high-temperature superconductors (HTS). Their results* could lead to lower cost and significantly improved performance of superconductors in a wide variety of applications, such as power transmission, power grid reliability and advanced physics research.One of the main challenges in...

2008-02-29 03:00:27

By Das, S Singh, S B; Mohanty, O N; Bhadeshia, H K D H The basic science behind bake hardening steels is well understood in terms of the interactions between interstitial solutes and dislocations. However, the manufacture of such alloys involves a variety of other variables, the interactions between which are influential in controlling the extent of hardening. In the present work, a model which includes the chemical composition of the steel, the strain before aging and the annealing and...


Word of the Day
ramage
  • Boughs or branches.
  • Warbling of birds in trees.
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