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peacock
2014-09-22 03:00:21

Chris Bunting, University of Leeds The magnificent plumage of the peacock may not be quite the sacrifice to love that it appears to be, University of Leeds researchers have discovered. Dr. Graham Askew, from the University’s School of Biomedical Sciences, filmed five Indian peacocks taking off using two high-speed video cameras to try to work out what price male birds pay for carrying the spectacular iridescent feathers they use in displays to attract females. “These feathers...

What Peahens Want
2013-07-25 14:55:11

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Finding out what women want is a question that science may never answer. However, a team of biologists from the University of California, Davis and Duke University has gained new insight into what a typical peahen may be looking for in her mate. Peacocks are renowned for their colorful trains, which are grown during the mating season and used to attract females. But what about the train catches a female eye? To see how these...

Distinctive Male Peacock Love Call Allures Females From Afar
2012-12-21 12:05:04

[Watch Video: Male Peacock Demonstrates 'Hoot-Dash Display'] redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online The distinctive sound made by male peacocks just before mating attracts female voyeurs for reasons currently unknown, a Duke University researcher has discovered. The India peafowl's unique pre-copulation ritual, which is also referred to as the "hoot-dash display," involves the male members of the Phasianinae family dashing toward a female companion and squawking...

Zebrafish Perform Colorful Courtship Displays
2012-11-30 14:58:35

University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna Billy Ocean may not have been thinking of fish when he wrote “The Color of Love”, but Sophie Hutter, Attila Hettyey, Dustin Penn, and Sarah Zala from the Konrad Lorenz Institute of Ethology of the University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna were able to show that zebrafish males and females both wear their brightest colors while wooing a mate. Elaborate secondary sexual displays are often overlooked because many species attract mates...

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2012-07-09 10:05:52

John Neumann for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online A team of biologists from Tufts University in Boston may have answered the question of what attracts fireflies to each other. Dr. Adam South, with supervision from colleague Sara Lewis, who have been studying fireflies for 20 years, used LED lights to mimic the flashes of amorous male fireflies. In the wild, females are very picky about what males they reveal themselves to during this part of the courtship routine. Females will only...

2012-05-03 09:43:47

In most species, females prefer the most intense courtship display males can muster, but a new study finds that female cowbirds actually prefer less intense displays. The full results are published May 2 in the open access journal PLoS ONE. The researchers, led by Adrian O'Loghlen of University of California Santa Barbara, write that males direct more intense wing-spreading displays toward other males as aggressive communicative signals. It appears, however, that while these signals may...

2011-06-06 20:30:00

TOKYO, June 6, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- Sony Computer Entertainment (SCE) today announced that it will release a 24-inch 3D Display available this fall in Japan, North America, Europe/PAL territories, and Asian countries/regions. For North America, the 3D Display comes bundled with 3D Glasses, an HDMI cable and the highly anticipated Resistance 3 title from Insomniac Games for PlayStation®3 (PS3®) at an attractive recommended retail price (RRP) of...

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2011-04-28 09:22:03

Male peacock tail plumage and courtship antics likely influence their success at attracting and mating with females, according to recent Queen's University research. Roz Dakin and Robert Montgomerie have found that natural variation in the number of eyespots on a peacock's tail does not impact a male's mating success. However, peacocks whose tails are clipped to considerably reduce the number of eyespots are less successful at mating. Female rejection of males with substantially fewer...

2011-04-07 13:57:24

Female deer do not always choose the bigger and dominant males to mate with, scientists from Queen Mary, University of London and Hartpury College have found. The research, which was undertaken in Dublin's Phoenix Park on a herd of fallow deer, focussed on females who chose not to mate with the 'top' males. The study, published today (6 April) in PLoS ONE found that yearling females tended to mate with a higher proportion of younger, lower ranking males while older females actively avoided...


Word of the Day
ramage
  • Boughs or branches.
  • Warbling of birds in trees.
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