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Great Northern Loon Gavia immer
2012-12-17 13:02:12

A large member of the loon, or diver, family of birds, this species is well-known as the Common Loon in North America and the Great Northern Diver in Eurasia; its current name is a compromise proposed by the International Ornithological Committee. There are 5 loon species that make up the genus Gavia, the only genus of the family Gavidae and order Gaviiformes. The Great Northern Loon is only...

Pacific Diver Gavia pacifica
2012-03-22 23:41:29

The Pacific Diver (Gavia pacifica), also known as the Pacific Loon, is a species of bird in the loon family Gaviidae. Its habitat is on deep lakes in the tundra region of Alaska and northern Canada as far east as Baffin Island, and in Russia east of the Lena River. Unlike most other loons/divers, the Pacific Diver may migrate in flocks, wintering at sea along the Pacific Coast, or on large...

Red-throated Diver
2005-06-02 10:24:13

The Red-throated Diver, known in North America as Red-throated Loon (Gavia stellata) is the smallest member of the loon or diver family. It is typically 55-67 cm (24" to 27") in length with a 91-110 cm wingspan. It is considered to be the most widely distributed diver and is known to breed in northern Eurasia and Arctic Canada. It winters over a much wider range on coasts and on large lakes....

Yellow-billed Loon Gavia adamsii
2014-06-01 20:26:48

The White-billed Diver, known as the Yellow-billed Loon (Gavia adamsii) in North America, is the largest member of the loon or diver family. At 77-90cm in length and a wingspan of 135-150 cm it is only marginally larger than the similar Great Northern Diver. It breeds in the Arctic in Russia, Alaska and Canada and winters at sea mainly off the coasts of Norway and western Canada and can...

Word of the Day
cock-a-hoop
  • Exultant; jubilant; triumphant; on the high horse.
  • Tipsy; slightly intoxicated.
This word may come from the phrase 'to set cock on hoop,' or 'to drink festively.' Its origin otherwise is unclear. A theory, according to the Word Detective, is that it's a 'transliteration of the French phrase 'coq a huppe,' meaning a rooster displaying its crest ('huppe') in a pose of proud defiance.' Therefore, 'cock-a-hoop' would 'liken a drunken man to a boastful and aggressive rooster.'
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