Quantcast

Latest Diving bird Stories

Swimming Birds Evolved Rudder-like Tail To Dive For Food
2014-02-27 15:43:42

PLOS The convergent evolution of tail shapes in diving birds may be driven by foraging style, according to a paper published in PLOS ONE on February 26, 2014 by Ryan Felice and Patrick O'Connor from Ohio University. Birds use their wings and specialized tail to maneuver through the air while flying. It turns out that the purpose of a bird's tail may have also aided in their diversification by allowing them to use a greater variety of foraging strategies. To better understand the...

2006-11-29 12:00:40

By Steve Vantreese, The Paducah Sun, Ky. Nov. 29--The presence of fish-eating fowl on our area's huge lakes is greatly increased nowadays. Two species of water birds are highly notable because they have come seemingly out of nowhere in recent years to represent a significant presence on Kentucky Lake and Lake Barkley -- double-crested cormorants and white pelicans. The snaky-necked cormorants have gone from a rarity to regulars on the lakes. They are diving birds, black as adults and...


Word of the Day
sough
  • A murmuring sound; a rushing or whistling sound, like that of the wind; a deep sigh.
  • A gentle breeze; a waft; a breath.
  • Any rumor that engages general attention.
  • A cant or whining mode of speaking, especially in preaching or praying; the chant or recitative characteristic of the old Presbyterians in Scotland.
  • To make a rushing, whistling, or sighing sound; emit a hollow murmur; murmur or sigh like the wind.
  • To breathe in or as in sleep.
  • To utter in a whining or monotonous tone.
According to the OED, from the 16th century, this word is 'almost exclusively Scots and northern dialect until adopted in general literary use in the 19th.'
Related