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Last updated on April 24, 2014 at 17:35 EDT

Latest DLC1 Stories

2013-09-20 11:07:58

Like normal cells, cancer cells require amino acids for growth, maintenance, and cell signaling, and L-type amino acid transporters (LATs) are the delivery vehicles that supply them. Metastatic, castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) cells are highly dependent on LATs to deliver the amino acid leucine that the cells need for growth and proliferation, according to a study published September 19 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute. To investigate the function of LATs in...

2012-06-21 06:24:10

CINCINNATI, June 21, 2012 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Scientists have developed a small-molecule-inhibiting drug that in early laboratory cell tests stopped breast cancer cells from spreading and also promoted the growth of early nerve cells called neurites. (Logo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20110406/MM79025LOGO) Researchers from Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center report their findings online June 21 in Chemistry & Biology. The scientists named their lead drug...

2009-07-30 10:17:38

UCD Conway researchers have characterized epigenetic signature changes in prostate cells under conditions of low oxygen levels that may lead to tumor development. The results of the study published this month in the scientific journal, Human Molecular Genetics may provide important targets for the early detection and manipulation of prostate cancer.Chronic hypoxia, or low tissue oxygen levels, is a natural feature of the aging prostate either due to declining blood flow to the area or local...

2009-07-28 09:53:00

Distinctive patterns of genes turned off "“ or left on "“ in healthy versus cancerous cells could enable early screening for many common cancers and maybe help avoid them, Medical College of Georgia scientists say.Researchers are comparing chemical alterations, called DNA methylation, in the body's basic building block in healthy colon, breast, brain and lymphatic cells and their cancerous counterpart to find telltale patterns that could one day be detected in the blood, urine or...

2005-09-19 15:41:28

Most investigations into cancer have focused on chemical signals, but a new research study provides rare insight into how mechanical force can regulate cellular behavior. The study uncovers a link between tissue tension and tumor formation, suggesting that the stiffness of a tissue can influence molecular signals that promote the malignant behavior of tumor cells. The findings, published in the September issue of Cancer Cell, provide exciting new insight into the mechanisms that link the...