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Latest DNA barcoding Stories

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2009-11-20 07:40:48

While most of us would never willingly consume a highly endangered species, doing so might be as easy as plucking sushi from a bento box. New genetic detective work from the Sackler Institute for Comparative Genomics at the American Museum of Natural History shows that bluefin tuna is routinely plated in sushi bars sampled in New York and Colorado. A quarter of what was labeled as tuna on sushi menus was bluefin, and some was even escolar, a waxy, buttery fish often labeled "white tuna" that...

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2009-11-09 13:25:00

Scientists have borrowed a monitoring technique from supermarkets by creating a collection of so-called "DNA barcodes" to understand how the diets of animals would change with global warming. "There's been an extraordinary growth in the use of the technology," David Schindel, executive secretary of the Consortium for the Barcode of Life (CBOL) told Reuters. Schnidel said the system has grown since 2007, with now more than 700,000 records from 65,000 species. The use of barcodes for plant...

2009-09-15 10:55:35

Researchers from several institutions including the University of Colorado at Boulder have sequenced DNA "barcodes" for as many as 25 hunted wildlife species, providing information that can be used to better monitor the elusive trade of wildlife products, or bushmeat. Identifying such DNA barcodes can help wildlife officials crack down on illegal bushmeat trafficking since many animal species are in sharp decline from illegal trade estimated to be worth $5 billion to $8 billion annually, said...

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2009-09-14 13:56:40

Demonstrating that short genetic sequences identify migratory marine species Conservation geneticists who study sea turtles have a new tool to help track this highly migratory and endangered group of marine animals: DNA barcodes. DNA barcodes are short genetic sequences that efficiently distinguish species from each other"”even if the samples from which the DNA is extracted are minute or degraded. Now, a recently published research paper by scientists from the American Museum of Natural...

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2009-09-05 12:20:00

A new tool proved for tracking the global trade in wildlife Leather handbags and chunks of red meat: when wildlife specialists find these items in shipping containers, luggage, or local markets, they can now use newly published genetic sequences known as "DNA barcodes" to pinpoint the species of origin. Experts hope that this simple technique will track the harvesting of bushmeat (or wildlife hunted largely in Asia, South and Central America, and Africa) and will ultimately crack down on the...

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2009-07-29 12:55:00

After four years of debate, an international team of scientists from 25 institutions has finally agreed on a standard "DNA barcode" for plants for quick and easy identification of species. The team hopes that the agreement will allow for the eventual formation of a global plant DNA library, which can be shared by the scientific community. The barcode is a short sequence of DNA unique to every species that could ultimately have a handheld plant "scanner" for quickly identifying species...

2009-07-28 14:06:43

An international team of scientists, including botanists from the University of Toronto, have identified a pair of genes which can be used to catalogue the world's plants using a technique known as DNA barcoding "” a rapid and automated classification method that uses a short genetic marker in an organism's DNA to identify it as belonging to a particular species."Barcoding provides an efficient means by which we can discover the many undescribed species that exist on earth," says...

2009-06-25 08:48:33

The goal of DNA barcoding is to find a simple, cheap, and rapid DNA assay that can be converted to a readily accessible technical skill that bypasses the need to rely on highly trained taxonomic specialists for identifications of the world's biota. This is driven by a desire to open taxonomic identifications to all user groups and by the short supply of taxonomists that do not even exist in many groups. Although DNA barcoding is being rapidly accepted in the scientific literature and popular...

2009-06-08 11:53:22

Data is crucial to minimizing birdstrikes, researchers sayUsing forensic data from feather remains, scientists have identified the birds that caused the Jan. 15 airline crash into the Hudson River as migratory Canada geese. The study, published online in the journal Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment, will help managers better assess how to prevent such strikes in the future.Led by Peter Marra of the Smithsonian National Zoo's Migratory Bird Center, the researchers applied DNA...

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2008-10-02 08:00:28

The DNA sequence of the fungus that produces penicillin has been deciphered by Dutch researchers. This monumental discovery is just in time for the 80th anniversary of the breakthrough of penicillin, discovered by Sir Alexander Fleming. Researchers hope that discovering the genome of Penicillium chrysogenum will increase further development of new antibiotics to help surmount the problems of resistance. Penicillium chrysogenum is employed in the manufacture of antibiotics such as...


Word of the Day
call-note
  • The call or cry of a bird or other animal to its mate or its young.
'Call-note' is newer than 'bird-call,' which originally referred to 'an instrument for imitating the note of birds' but now also refers to 'the song or cry of a bird.'
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