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Latest DNA microarray Stories

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2010-05-14 06:52:35

UA research with mice indicates that immune deficiencies associated with weightlessness may pose a challenge to manned space missions to far-away destinations such as Mars. Astronauts are known to have a higher risk of getting sick compared to their Earth-bound peers. The stresses that go with weightlessness, confined crew quarters, being away from family and friends and a busy work schedule - all the while not getting enough sleep - are known to wreak havoc on the immune system. A research...

2010-04-29 14:39:00

-- New Approach Also Specifies Results for Individual Patients -- PHILADELPHIA, April 29 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- In findings that may speed the search for disease-causing genes, a new study challenges the prevailing view that common diseases are usually caused by common gene variants (mutations). Instead, say genetics researchers, the culprits may be numerous rare variants, located in DNA sequences farther away from the original "hot spots" than scientists have been accustomed to look....

2010-04-14 07:20:00

CARLISLE, Mass., April 14 /PRNewswire/ -- VigeneTech Inc. has released an OEM image analysis solution to support Life Technologies Corporation's Prodigy(TM), an automated, research-use array platform. Life Technologies is a global biotechnology tools company providing premier systems, consumables, and services for scientific researchers around the world. It sources VigeneTech, developers of novel image analysis, automation and instrumentation software, to provide the core image analysis...

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2010-03-08 08:11:48

Scientists at the Stanford University School of Medicine have devised a software algorithm that could enable a common laboratory device to virtually separate a whole-blood sample into its different cell types and detect medically important gene-activity changes specific to any one of those cell types. In a study to be published online March 7 in Nature Methods, the scientists reported that they had successfully used the new technique to pinpoint changes in one cell type that flagged the...

2010-03-01 15:23:03

STANFORD, Calif. "” Like homing in to an elusive radio frequency in a busy city, human embryonic stem cells must sort through a seemingly endless number of options to settle on the specific genetic message, or station, that instructs them to become more-specialized cells in the body (Easy Listening, maybe, for skin cells, and Techno for neurons?). Now researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine have shown that this tuning process is accomplished in part by restricting the...

2010-02-01 18:39:09

Mapping DNase I hypersensitive sites has long been the standard method for identifying genetic regulatory elements such as promoters, enhancers, silencers, insulators, and locus control regions. Sequences that are nucleosome-depleted, presumably to provide access for transcription factors, are selectively digested by DNase I. Traditional low-throughput methods use Southern blots to then identify these hypersensitive sites. In the February issue of Cold Spring Harbor Protocols...

2010-01-25 07:08:59

A new assay capable of examining hundreds of proteins at once and enabling new experiments that could dramatically change our understanding of cancer and other diseases has been invented by a team of University of Chicago scientists. Described Jan. 24 in the journal Nature Methods, the new micro-western arrays combine the specificity of the popular "Western blot" protein assay with the large scale of DNA microarrays. The technique will allow scientists to observe much of a cell's intricate...

2009-12-25 21:57:50

Genomic switches can predispose an individual to one set of autoimmune disorders but protect the same person against another set of them, scientists at Stanford University School of Medicine have found. "Maybe we should stop considering all autoimmune diseases in one lumped category," said Atul Butte, MD, PhD, assistant professor of pediatrics and of biomedical informatics and director of the Center for Pediatric Bioinformatics at Lucile Packard Children's Hospital. "It looks as if there may...

2009-12-01 17:41:00

NEW YORK, Dec. 1 /PRNewswire/ -- Reportlinker.com announces that a new market research report is available in its catalogue: Advances in the Use of Biomarkers in Biochip and Microarray Testing: Innovative technologies, growth opportunities and the future market outlook http://www.reportlinker.com/p0165655/Advances-in-the-Use-of-Biomarkers-in-Biochip-and-Microarray-Testing-Innovative-technologies-growth-opportunities-and-the-future-market-outlook.html Microarrays and biochips are small...

2009-11-19 07:30:00

FREMONT, Calif., Nov. 19 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- WaferGen Biosystems, Inc. (OTC Bulletin Board: WGBS), a leading developer of state-of-the-art genetic analysis systems, today announced a new, innovative service for gene-expression profiling of thousands of genes using the SmartChip(TM) Real-Time PCR System. By taking advantage of the SmartChip Real-Time PCR system, WaferGen will offer universities, pharmaceutical and diagnostic companies a service that utilizes pathway-specific gene...


Word of the Day
cacodemon
  • An evil spirit; a devil.
  • A nightmare.
  • In astrology, the twelfth house of a scheme or figure of the heavens: so called from its signifying dreadful things, such as secret enemies, great losses, imprisonment, etc.
'Cacodemon' comes from a Greek term meaning 'evil genius.'
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