Quantcast
Last updated on April 18, 2014 at 21:21 EDT

Latest DNA repair Stories

2010-06-24 16:07:38

University of Rhode Island Pharmacy Professor Bongsup Cho knows there are cancer-causing chemicals in diesel fumes and cigarette smoke. The biomedical scientist also knows that some of the same chemicals are found in the gooey tar balls that are being produced as a result of the oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, which began April 20 when a rig exploded and caught fire. But what he and other scientists have little knowledge of is the long-range impact of the spill on humans and wildlife at the...

472aa1e069e15cc4a4baa4a65834af6d1
2010-06-22 12:04:23

The discovery could help to design new strategies to increase their sensitivity to antibiotics A study led by researchers from Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (UAB) describes one of the mechanisms in which pathogenic bacteria populations control the way they spread over the surface of the organs they infect and stop when they detect the presence of an antibiotic, only to resume again when the effect wears off. The star of this process is the RecA protein, which...

2010-06-01 19:44:48

Researchers at the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute (UPCI) and the School of Medicine have discovered that inhibiting a key molecule in a DNA repair pathway could provide the means to make cancer cells more sensitive to radiation therapy while protecting healthy cells. The findings are published in Science Signaling and provide new insights into mechanisms of how the body fixes environmentally induced DNA damage and into the deadly neurological disease ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T),...

2010-04-11 14:19:13

Findings have potential for cancer, other age-related diseases Scientists have shown in multiple contexts that DNA damage over our lifetimes is a key mechanism behind the development of cancer and other age-related diseases. Not everyone gets these diseases, because the body has multiple mechanisms for repairing the damage caused to DNA by aging, the environment and other human behaviors "“ but the mechanisms behind certain kinds of DNA repair have not been well-understood. In a paper...

2010-03-26 13:29:33

The presence of the protein poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) in tumors can help predict their response to chemotherapy, a German scientist will tell the seventh European Breast Cancer Conference (EBCC7) in Barcelona tomorrow (Saturday 27 March). Professor Gunter von Minckwitz, from the German Breast Group Forschungs GmBH, Neu-Isenburg, says that, contrary to current belief that PARP is associated with a limited number of tumors, he and his team found for the first time that PARP expression...

2010-03-26 07:25:45

Study offers new insights into cancer development Identification of two new proteins in the Fanconi anemia DNA repair pathway may help explain genetic instability in people with Fanconi anemia and how otherwise healthy people are susceptible to cancer from environmentally triggered DNA damage. A study in the March 26 Molecular Cell adds another layer of complexity to the multifaceted Fanconi anemia (FA) pathway. The research was led by scientists in the division of Experimental Hematology and...

2010-03-15 16:04:56

A quest that began over a decade ago with a chance observation has reached a milestone: the identification of a gene that may regulate regeneration in mammals. The absence of this single gene, called p21, confers a healing potential in mice long thought to have been lost through evolution and reserved for creatures like flatworms, sponges, and some species of salamander. In a report published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, researchers from The Wistar Institute...

2010-03-08 14:35:00

Program Will Include Paid Internship Program for Students WASHINGTON, March 8 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- The Justice Department today announced a new internship program that will employ students part-time to conduct intensive outreach efforts with Native Americans and their families whose work in the uranium industry during the Cold War benefited the United States but exposed them to radiation and may entitle them to compensation under the Radiation Exposure Compensation Act (RECA). The...

2010-03-04 16:52:49

Adding a new link to our understanding of the complex chain of chemistry that keeps living cells alive, a team of researchers from the University of Vermont (UVM), the University of Utah, Vanderbilt University and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has demonstrated for the first time the specific activity of the protein NEIL3, one of a group responsible for maintaining the integrity of DNA in humans and other mammals. Their work reported last week* sheds new light on a...

2010-02-18 12:23:54

DNA damage sensor also responds to oxidative harm outside the nucleus HOUSTON - ATM, a protein that reacts to DNA damage by ordering repairs or the suicide of the defective cell, plays a similar, previously unknown role in response to oxidative damage outside of the nucleus, researchers report this week in the online version of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. "This tumor-suppressor that works in the nucleus to prevent replication of defective cells also has a second life...