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Latest DNA repair Stories

2010-03-15 16:04:56

A quest that began over a decade ago with a chance observation has reached a milestone: the identification of a gene that may regulate regeneration in mammals. The absence of this single gene, called p21, confers a healing potential in mice long thought to have been lost through evolution and reserved for creatures like flatworms, sponges, and some species of salamander. In a report published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, researchers from The Wistar Institute...

2010-03-08 14:35:00

Program Will Include Paid Internship Program for Students WASHINGTON, March 8 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- The Justice Department today announced a new internship program that will employ students part-time to conduct intensive outreach efforts with Native Americans and their families whose work in the uranium industry during the Cold War benefited the United States but exposed them to radiation and may entitle them to compensation under the Radiation Exposure Compensation Act (RECA). The...

2010-03-04 16:52:49

Adding a new link to our understanding of the complex chain of chemistry that keeps living cells alive, a team of researchers from the University of Vermont (UVM), the University of Utah, Vanderbilt University and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has demonstrated for the first time the specific activity of the protein NEIL3, one of a group responsible for maintaining the integrity of DNA in humans and other mammals. Their work reported last week* sheds new light on a...

2010-02-18 12:23:54

DNA damage sensor also responds to oxidative harm outside the nucleus HOUSTON - ATM, a protein that reacts to DNA damage by ordering repairs or the suicide of the defective cell, plays a similar, previously unknown role in response to oxidative damage outside of the nucleus, researchers report this week in the online version of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. "This tumor-suppressor that works in the nucleus to prevent replication of defective cells also has a second life...

2010-02-17 11:00:00

PLEASANTON, Calif., Feb. 17 /PRNewswire/ -- Roche Molecular Systems, Inc. (SIX: RO, ROG; OTCQX: RHHBY) announced today a research collaboration with Merck Sharp & Dohme Corp. (a subsidiary of Merck & Co., Inc.) providing Merck access to Roche's developmental microarray-based AmpliChip p53 Test, which is designed to detect mutations in the tumor suppressor gene p53. By identifying cancers that harbor a dysfunctional p53 gene, the companies aim to achieve better treatment outcomes...

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2010-02-16 10:05:00

A discovery by Newcastle University experts could provide the next step in fighting age related diseases, such as diabetes and heart disease. Scientists from the University's Institute for Ageing and Health have used state-of-the-art laboratory techniques and sophisticated mathematical modelling to help crack the problem of why cells age. The ageing process has its roots deep within the cells and molecules that make up our bodies and experts have identified the molecular pathway that reacts...

2010-02-10 11:27:57

Scientists have shown that cells' DNA-reading machinery can skim through certain kinds of damaged DNA without skipping any letters in the genetic "text." The studies, performed in bacteria, suggest a new mechanism that can allow bacteria to develop resistance to antibiotics. The results were published online this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. The senior author is Paul Doetsch, PhD, professor of biochemistry and radiation oncology at Emory University School of...

2010-02-09 16:32:27

Dr. François Robert and colleagues have accomplished a technical breakthrough The research group of Dr. François Robert, a researcher at the Institut de recherches cliniques de Montr©al (IRCM), in collaboration with the team of Dr. Daniel Durocher (Samuel Lunenfeld Research Institute and University of Toronto) accomplished a technical breakthrough: they mapped all the fragile sites of a living organism, the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The...

2010-02-09 08:22:31

A team of researchers, led by Pier Paolo Pandolfi, at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, has identified a new type of cellular senescence (i.e., irreversible arrest of cell growth) and determined a way to enhance it to suppress prostate tumor development and growth in mice. Previous work by Pandolfi and colleagues determined that inactivation of the protein Pten leads to a senescence response that opposes tumorigenesis. In this study, Pten-loss"“induced cellular senescence...

2010-01-15 17:38:35

Biomarkers, new treatments possible for Friedreich's ataxia Elevated levels of DNA damage have for the first time been found in the cellular mitochondria and nuclei of patients with the inherited, progressive nervous system disease called Friedreich's ataxia (FRDA), says a multicenter research team led by an expert from the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute (UPCI). The findings, described today in PLoS Genetics, shed light on the molecular abnormalities that lead to the disease, as...


Word of the Day
out-herod
  • In the phrase to out-herod Herod, to be more violent than Herod (as represented in the old mystery plays); hence, to exceed in any excess of evil.
Herod refers to 'Herod the Great,' a Roman client king and 'a madman who murdered his own family and a great many rabbis.' According to the OED, the term is 'chiefly with allusion to Shakespeare's use' in Hamlet.
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