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Latest DNA repair Stories

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2010-02-16 10:05:00

A discovery by Newcastle University experts could provide the next step in fighting age related diseases, such as diabetes and heart disease. Scientists from the University's Institute for Ageing and Health have used state-of-the-art laboratory techniques and sophisticated mathematical modelling to help crack the problem of why cells age. The ageing process has its roots deep within the cells and molecules that make up our bodies and experts have identified the molecular pathway that reacts...

2010-02-10 11:27:57

Scientists have shown that cells' DNA-reading machinery can skim through certain kinds of damaged DNA without skipping any letters in the genetic "text." The studies, performed in bacteria, suggest a new mechanism that can allow bacteria to develop resistance to antibiotics. The results were published online this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. The senior author is Paul Doetsch, PhD, professor of biochemistry and radiation oncology at Emory University School of...

2010-02-09 16:32:27

Dr. François Robert and colleagues have accomplished a technical breakthrough The research group of Dr. François Robert, a researcher at the Institut de recherches cliniques de Montr©al (IRCM), in collaboration with the team of Dr. Daniel Durocher (Samuel Lunenfeld Research Institute and University of Toronto) accomplished a technical breakthrough: they mapped all the fragile sites of a living organism, the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The...

2010-02-09 08:22:31

A team of researchers, led by Pier Paolo Pandolfi, at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, has identified a new type of cellular senescence (i.e., irreversible arrest of cell growth) and determined a way to enhance it to suppress prostate tumor development and growth in mice. Previous work by Pandolfi and colleagues determined that inactivation of the protein Pten leads to a senescence response that opposes tumorigenesis. In this study, Pten-loss"“induced cellular senescence...

2010-01-15 17:38:35

Biomarkers, new treatments possible for Friedreich's ataxia Elevated levels of DNA damage have for the first time been found in the cellular mitochondria and nuclei of patients with the inherited, progressive nervous system disease called Friedreich's ataxia (FRDA), says a multicenter research team led by an expert from the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute (UPCI). The findings, described today in PLoS Genetics, shed light on the molecular abnormalities that lead to the disease, as...

2009-12-25 22:02:32

A new study establishes a molecular link that bridges two rare inherited disorders and explains why these diseases result in genetic instability. The research, published by Cell Press in the December 24th issue of the journal Molecular Cell, may lead to a better understanding of the complex mechanisms that enable cells to repair damaged DNA. Fanconi Anemia (FA) and Bloom's Syndrome (BS) are unique rare genetic disorders that have some key characteristics in common. Both FA and BS are...

2009-12-25 21:54:45

In order to preserve our DNA, cells have developed an intricate system for monitoring and repairing DNA damage. Yet precisely how the initial damage signal is converted into a repair response remains unclear. Researchers at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies have now solved a crucial piece of the complex puzzle. In a forthcoming article in the Dec. 24 issue of Molecular Cell, they show that a protein named CtIP plays an essential role in the DNA damage "signal-to-repair" conversion...

2009-12-23 16:54:52

Genome rearrangements in 24 breast cancers The first detailed search of breast cancer genomes to uncover genomic rearrangements is published today. The team characterized the ways in which the human genome is broken and put back together in 24 cases of breast cancer. Rearrangements involve reshuffling and reorganization of the genome and include deletions, duplications and novel juxtaposition of DNA sequences. The study shows that breast cancer samples can differ greatly in the extent to...

2009-12-10 12:56:50

MIT and Boston University researchers have discovered that the drug hydroxyurea kills bacteria by inducing them to produce molecules toxic to themselves "” a conclusion that raises the possibility of finding new antibiotics that use similar mechanisms. Hydroxyurea inhibits the enzyme critical for making the building blocks for DNA, so for decades it has been used to study the consequences of inhibiting DNA replication in E. coli, yeast and mammalian cells. It is also sometimes used in...

2009-12-09 15:10:00

Robarts researcher identifies protein which regulates cell suicide When cells experience DNA damage, they'll try to repair it. But if that fails, the damaged cells are supposed to self-destruct, a process called apoptosis. A cancer researcher at Robarts Research Institute at The University of Western Ontario has identified a protein that regulates apoptosis, a new discovery which has implications for both the diagnosis and treatment of cancer. Caroline Schild-Poulter's findings are now...