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Latest DNA repair Stories

2009-12-08 20:03:10

Small molecule plus TMZ appears to lower tumor resistance University of Florida researchers have found a way to use just a fraction of the normal dosage of a highly toxic, debilitating chemotherapy drug to achieve even better results against colon cancer cells. More research is needed before the therapy can be tested in patients, but the discovery in human colon cancer cell lines and mice with established human tumors suggests that the addition of a small molecule to the cancer drug...

2009-12-08 12:02:00

NEW YORK, Dec. 8 /PRNewswire/ -- Reportlinker.com announces that a new market research report is available in its catalogue: Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) Research Products http://www.reportlinker.com/p0167261/PolyADP-ribose-polymerase-PARP-Research-Products.html This PARP Research Products market report explores are a superfamily of 18 proteins, of which PARP-1 is the best characterized. They are enzymes that are activated by DNA breaks to facilitate DNA repair. Currently, there is...

2009-12-04 15:08:06

A protein that plays a key role in copying DNA also plays a vital role in repairing breaks in it, UC Davis scientists have found. The work is helping researchers understand how cancer cells can resist radiation and chemotherapy, as well as how cells become cancerous in the first place. The protein, known as proliferating cell nuclear antigen, forms a ring that fits around the DNA double helix. This cuff-like ring helps to keep in place DNA polymerase, the enzyme that makes a copy of the DNA...

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2009-11-30 09:04:59

Understanding how kangaroos repair their DNA could be the key to preventing skin cancer in the future, according to new research by Dr Linda Feketeová and Dr Uta Wille from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Free Radical Chemistry and Biotechnology at The University of Melbourne. Together with scientists from The University of Innsbruck, Austria, Dr Feketeová and Dr Wille are working toward reducing the number of skin cancer-related cases by investigating the chemistry behind...

2009-11-23 17:07:42

Biomethylation of arsenic compounds appears to cause oxidative DNA damage and to increase their carcinogenicity, according to a new study published online November 23 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute. Although biomethylation was once believed to detoxify inorganic arsenic, it is now thought to enhance its toxicity and potentially its carcinogenicity. To assess the role of arsenic biomethylation in oxidative DNA damage in mice, Michael P. Waalkes, Ph.D., of the National Cancer...

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2009-11-17 09:13:03

Scientists at the John Innes Centre in Norwich, UK, have shown how plants can protect themselves against genetic damage caused by environmental stresses. The growing tips of plant roots and shoots have an in-built mechanism that, if it detects damage to the DNA, causes the cell to 'commit suicide' rather than pass on its defective DNA. Plants have, at the very tips of their roots and shoots, small populations of stem cells, through which they are able to grow and produce new tissue throughout...

2009-11-16 09:39:30

MDC Researchers Identify Start Signal for Cell Survival Program Cancer researchers of the Max Delbrck Center for Molecular Medicine (MDC) Berlin-Buch have gained new insights into how cells react to DNA damage. Dr. Michael Stilmann, Dr. Michael Hinz and Professor Claus Scheidereit have shown that the protein PARP-1, which detects DNA damage within seconds, activates the transcription factor NF-kappaB, a well-known regulator of gene expression. NF-kappaB triggers a survival program, which...

2009-11-12 22:38:24

The seeming invincibility of cancerous tumors may be crumbling, thanks to a promising new gene therapy that eliminates the ability of certain cells to repair themselves. Researchers at the Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine have discovered that inactivation of a DNA repair gene called Hus1 efficiently kills cells lacking p53 -- a gene mutated in the majority of human cancers. Using a mouse model, senior author Robert Weiss, associate professor of molecular genetics, first...

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2009-10-21 11:47:59

Researchers report that a single-stranded DNA-binding protein (SSB), once thought to be a static player among the many molecules that interact with DNA, actually moves back and forth along single-stranded DNA, gradually allowing other proteins to repair, recombine or replicate the strands. Their study, of SSB in the bacterium Escherichia coli, appears today in the journal Nature. Whenever the double helix of DNA unravels, exposing each strand to the harsh environment of the cell, SSB is...

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2009-10-16 09:39:00

Research Supports Potential for New Anti-Cancer Agent A study published in the October issue of Nature Genetics demonstrates that loss of the tumor-suppressor protein p53, coupled with elimination of the DNA-maintenance protein ATR, severely disrupts tissue maintenance in mice. As a result, tissues deteriorate rapidly, which is generally fatal in these animals. In addition, the study provides supportive evidence for the use of inhibitors of ATR in cancer therapy. Essentially, says senior...