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Latest DNA repair Stories

2009-11-16 09:39:30

MDC Researchers Identify Start Signal for Cell Survival Program Cancer researchers of the Max Delbrck Center for Molecular Medicine (MDC) Berlin-Buch have gained new insights into how cells react to DNA damage. Dr. Michael Stilmann, Dr. Michael Hinz and Professor Claus Scheidereit have shown that the protein PARP-1, which detects DNA damage within seconds, activates the transcription factor NF-kappaB, a well-known regulator of gene expression. NF-kappaB triggers a survival program, which...

2009-11-12 22:38:24

The seeming invincibility of cancerous tumors may be crumbling, thanks to a promising new gene therapy that eliminates the ability of certain cells to repair themselves. Researchers at the Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine have discovered that inactivation of a DNA repair gene called Hus1 efficiently kills cells lacking p53 -- a gene mutated in the majority of human cancers. Using a mouse model, senior author Robert Weiss, associate professor of molecular genetics, first...

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2009-10-21 11:47:59

Researchers report that a single-stranded DNA-binding protein (SSB), once thought to be a static player among the many molecules that interact with DNA, actually moves back and forth along single-stranded DNA, gradually allowing other proteins to repair, recombine or replicate the strands. Their study, of SSB in the bacterium Escherichia coli, appears today in the journal Nature. Whenever the double helix of DNA unravels, exposing each strand to the harsh environment of the cell, SSB is...

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2009-10-16 09:39:00

Research Supports Potential for New Anti-Cancer Agent A study published in the October issue of Nature Genetics demonstrates that loss of the tumor-suppressor protein p53, coupled with elimination of the DNA-maintenance protein ATR, severely disrupts tissue maintenance in mice. As a result, tissues deteriorate rapidly, which is generally fatal in these animals. In addition, the study provides supportive evidence for the use of inhibitors of ATR in cancer therapy. Essentially, says senior...

2009-10-02 09:14:48

Understanding how serious breaks in DNA are repaired may help researchers to make cancer therapy more effective Researchers at The Scripps Research Institute have found, crystallized, and biologically characterized a poorly defined component of a key molecular complex that helps people to avoid cancer, but that also helps cancer cells resist chemotherapy. The research was published in the October 2, 2009 issue of the journal Cell. This biological machine"”the Mre11-Rad50-Nbs1 (MRN)...

2009-09-29 09:00:00

ROYAL PALM BEACH, Fla., Sept. 29 /PRNewswire/ -- The first anti-aging doctor to offer TA-65 treatment in the U.S., has discovered a way to apply similar technology to skin care. TA-65 is the newest and most dramatic technology in the world of life extension. It is the only commercially available product that lengthens human telomeres - the protective tips that cap the ends of your DNA. Each time your cells divide, your telomeres get shorter. When your telomeres run down, cell division...

2009-09-24 08:02:14

For years, health conscious people have been taking antioxidants to reduce the levels of reactive oxygen in their blood and prevent the DNA damage done by free radicals, which are the result of oxidative stress. But could excessive use of antioxidants deplete our immune systems? Research at UCLA's Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center has raised that question. It has been known for decades that reactive oxygen species (ROS) - ions or very small molecules that include free radicals - damage...

2009-09-11 07:50:17

While Fanconi anemia (FA) is a rare and dangerous disease, new laboratory research at The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center shows it may lead researchers toward clues in more common diseases, including highly hereditary types of breast cancer. In a study published in the Sept. 11 issue of the journal Molecular Cell, scientists report that recruitment of proteins to DNA damage sites is controlled by replication in both FA and BRCA cancer proteins. Lei Li, Ph.D, professor in...

2009-09-09 10:34:57

Results will be of great relevance to the cosmetics industry Scientists have uncovered a new role played by Vitamin C in protecting the skin. Researchers at the University of Leicester and Institute for Molecular and Cellular Biology in Portugal studied new protective properties of vitamin C in cells from the human skin, which could lead to better skin regeneration. The work, by Tiago Duarte, Marcus S. Cooke and G. Don Jones, found that a form of Vitamin C helped to promote wound healing and...

2009-09-07 14:31:17

A study that tracked genetic mutations through the human equivalent of about 5,000 years has demonstrated for the first time that oxidative DNA damage is a primary cause of the process of mutation - the fuel for evolution but also a leading cause of aging, cancer and other diseases. The research, just published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, also indicated that natural selection is affecting the parts of the genome that don't contain genes "“ supposedly "junk" DNA...


Word of the Day
call-note
  • The call or cry of a bird or other animal to its mate or its young.
'Call-note' is newer than 'bird-call,' which originally referred to 'an instrument for imitating the note of birds' but now also refers to 'the song or cry of a bird.'
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