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Latest DNA repair Stories

2011-07-01 12:56:51

Salk Institute scientists show how regulation of a key damage response protein can make the difference between survival and death after radiation Scientists at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies have found clues to the functioning of an important damage response protein in cells. The protein, p53, can cause cells to stop dividing or even to commit suicide when they show signs of DNA damage, and it is responsible for much of the tissue destruction that follows exposure to ionizing...

2011-06-30 13:41:10

Researchers at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute have demonstrated a molecular strategy they say could make a much larger variety of tumors treatable with PARP inhibitors, a promising new class of cancer drugs. Currently, the role of PARP inhibitors has mainly been restricted to cancers whose cells lack functioning versions of the damage-repair proteins BRCA1 or BRCA2 -- chiefly certain breast and ovarian cancers. In a paper published online by Nature Medicine, Geoffrey Shapiro, MD, and colleagues...

2011-06-16 21:29:36

Findings could lead to treatments to prevent premature aging and cancer Cells in the human body are constantly being exposed to stress from environmental chemicals or errors in routine cellular processes. While stress can cause damage, it can also provide the stimulus for undoing the damage. New research by a team of scientists at the University of Rochester has unveiled an important new mechanism that allows cells to recognize when they are under stress and prime the DNA repair machinery to...

2011-06-09 23:33:23

Blocking cyclin D1 might help sensitize tumors to radiation Scientists at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute have uncovered a new role for a key cancer protein, a finding that could pave the way for more-effective radiation treatment of a variety of tumors. Many cancers are driven in part by elevated levels of cyclin D1, which allow the cells to escape growth controls and proliferate abnormally. In the new research, reported in the June 9 issue of Nature, researchers discovered that cyclin D1 also...

2011-06-09 13:28:23

Researchers from the University of Sheffield have discovered valuable insight into how people develop B-cell lymphoma, one of the most common cancers in the UK. The team, from the University's Institute for Cancer Studies and funded by Leukaemia and Lymphoma Research, Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC) and Yorkshire Cancer Research, found that a mechanism different to that previously thought to be the cause of lymphoma may be responsible for the development of the...

2011-06-02 14:17:00

BOULDER, Colo., June 2, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- Clovis Oncology, Inc. announced today an agreement with Pfizer Inc. (NYSE: PFE) for the development and commercialization of Pfizer's oral and IV Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitor, PF-01367338, currently in Phase 1/2 development for solid tumors. PF-01367338 is a novel, orally active, small molecule inhibitor of PARP and will be developed by Clovis as both a monotherapy and in combination with chemotherapeutic agents for the...

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2011-05-31 06:10:00

In addition to its damaging effect on the environment and its illegal smuggling into developing countries, researchers have now linked e-waste to adverse effects on human health, such as inflammation and oxidative stress "“ precursors to cardiovascular disease, DNA damage and possibly cancer. In a study published today, Tuesday 31 May, in IOP Publishing's journal Environmental Research Letters, researchers took air samples from one of the largest e-waste dismantling areas in China and...

2011-05-23 07:23:05

(Ivanhoe Newswire) -- A new study shows a person's DNA repair system may play a role in determining if their cancer will recur. Investigators found colorectal cancer patients with defects in mismatched repair -- one of the body's systems for repairing DNA damage -- have lower rates of recurrence and better survival rates. About 15 percent of colorectal cancers are associated with mismatch repair defects. Researchers say it has never been clear whether these mismatches are linked to cancer...

2011-05-20 12:58:30

Colorectal cancer patients with defects in mismatch repair--one of the body's systems for repairing DNA damage--have lower recurrence rates and better survival rates than patients without such defects, according to a study published online May 19th in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute. About 15% of colorectal cancers are associated with mismatch repair defects. Some defects are caused by the inherited gene mutations found in Lynch syndrome and others occur by chance, or...

2011-05-16 15:23:39

A new discovery in mice by researchers at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center may one day allow doctors to spare some patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) from toxic treatments, while also opening the door for new therapeutic research. AML, the most common form of acute leukemia seen in adults, is an aggressive form of cancer that primarily affects the elderly. Despite years of research, outcomes for most patients remain poor, particularly for one subset of patients with a specific...


Word of the Day
mundungus
  • A stinking tobacco.
  • Offal; waste animal product; organic matter unfit for consumption.
This word comes from the Spanish 'mondongo,' tripe, entrails.