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Latest DNA replication Stories

2009-10-27 14:13:26

Scientists here have identified how the motions of an enzyme are related to correctly copying genetic instructions, setting the stage for studies that can uncover what happens when DNA copying mistakes are made. Perpetuation of DNA mistakes can cause mutations that lead to cancer and other diseases. But before scientists can determine how and when errors are made during DNA replication, they must first fully understand what's going on when the copying process works properly "“ a...

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2009-10-21 11:47:59

Researchers report that a single-stranded DNA-binding protein (SSB), once thought to be a static player among the many molecules that interact with DNA, actually moves back and forth along single-stranded DNA, gradually allowing other proteins to repair, recombine or replicate the strands. Their study, of SSB in the bacterium Escherichia coli, appears today in the journal Nature. Whenever the double helix of DNA unravels, exposing each strand to the harsh environment of the cell, SSB is...

2009-10-15 14:02:21

By discovering the atomic structure of a key human enzyme, researchers at The University of Texas at Austin have pointed the way toward designing anti-HIV drugs with far less toxic side effects. Their work was published this week in Cell. "Many anti-HIV drugs are designed to stop the process of DNA replication," says Dr. Whitney Yin, assistant professor of chemistry and biochemistry. "That turns out to be a great thing to do to help cure virus infections, because it stops the processes of...

2009-10-07 09:42:27

Using computer simulations, a team of University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers has identified some of the pathways through which single complementary strands of DNA interact and combine to form the double helix. Present in the cells of all living organisms, DNA is composed of two intertwined strands and contains the genetic "blueprint" through which all living organisms develop and function. Individual strands consist of nucleotides, which include a base, a sugar and a phosphate moiety....

2009-10-05 08:43:00

SAN FRANCISCO, Oct. 5 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Molecular biologist Elizabeth H. Blackburn, PhD, 60, of the University of California, San Francisco, today was named to receive the 2009 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine. Blackburn shares the award with Carol W. Greider of Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and Jack W. Szostak of Harvard Medical School. The scientists discovered an enzyme that plays a key role in normal cell function, as well as in cell aging and most...

2009-09-01 13:06:37

A process that limits the number of times a cell divides works much differently than had been thought, opening the door to potential new anticancer therapies, researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center report in the Aug. 7 issue of the journal Cell.Most cells in the human body divide only a certain number of times, via a countdown mechanism that stops them. When the controlling process goes wrong, the cells divide indefinitely, contributing to cancer growth.The number of times a cell...

2009-07-15 12:40:00

Article in Nature solves 3 major puzzles about the workings of a famous enzyme involved in DNA repairThe "sloppier copier" discovered by USC biologists is also the best sixth man in the DNA repair game, an article in the journal Nature shows.The enzyme known as DNA polymerase V (pol V) comes in when a cell's DNA is reeling from radiation damage or other serious blows. Pol V copies the damaged DNA as best it can "“ saving the life of the bacterial cell at the cost of adding hundreds of...

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2009-07-10 09:45:00

Telomeres, the repetitive sequences of DNA at the ends of linear chromosomes, have an important function: They protect vulnerable chromosome ends from molecular attack. Researchers at Rockefeller University now show that telomeres have their own weakness. They resemble unstable parts of the genome called fragile sites where DNA replication can stall and go awry. But what keeps our fragile telomeres from falling apart is a protein that ensures the smooth progression of DNA replication to the...

2009-07-01 13:56:06

A molecule called telomerase, best known for enabling unlimited cell division of stem cells and cancer cells, has a surprising additional role in the expression of genes in an important stem cell regulatory pathway, say researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine. The unexpected finding may lead to new anticancer therapies and a greater understanding of how adult and embryonic stem cells divide and specialize."Telomerase is the factor that accounts for the unlimited division of...

2009-02-06 10:03:50

Team finds that Orc1, part of machinery that initiates DNA replication, prevents excess centrosome duplication Before a cell can divide into two, first it must duplicate its genetic material--the DNA packed in its chromosomes. The two new sets of chromosomes then have to be separated from one another and correctly distributed to the resulting "daughter" cells, so that both daughter cells are genetically identical to the original, or "parent," cell. During cell division, a cellular organ...