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Latest Dolphin Stories

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2010-02-21 06:45:00

Apart from humans, dolphins are the only animals to develop a natural form of type 2 diabetes, researchers recently discovered. An American study found that bottlenose dolphins have insulin resistances similar to that seen in humans. However, unlike humans, dolphins are able to turn the conditions on and off when appropriate, so it doesn't pose harm to the animal. Research leader and veterinarian Stephanie Venn-Watson of the US National Marine Mammal Foundation said that these findings...

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2010-02-19 13:40:00

Scientists discover clues into human diseases by studying dolphins in a changing ocean A panel of governmental, academic and non-profit scientists speaking today at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) unveiled research suggesting that diseases found in dolphins are similar to human diseases and can provide clues into how human health might be affected by exposure to contaminated coastal water or seafood. "Dolphins and humans are both mammals,...

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2010-02-04 10:11:26

Extensive commercial fishing endangers dolphin populations in the Mediterranean. This has been shown in a new study carried out at the University of Haifa's Department of Maritime Civilizations. "Unfortunately, we turn our backs to the sea and do not give much consideration to our marine neighbors," states researcher Dr. Aviad Scheinin. The study, which was supervised by Prof. Ehud Spanier and Dr. Dan Kerem, examined the competition between the two top predators along the Mediterranean coast...

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2010-02-01 12:50:00

In an effort to save endangered marine animals from poachers, scientists in Taiwan plan to use DNA from whales and dolphins to convict the illegal hunters. Poachers often try to hide their tracks by cutting off the heads, tails and fins of the animals. Hsia Jung-sheng, an official from the Council of Agriculture, is in a process to outsmart them by using molecular technology that can pinpoint the species of the animals. "What they don't know is that the government has set up a comprehensive...

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2010-01-25 13:25:00

Only some bats and toothed whales rely on sophisticated echolocation, in which they emit sonar pulses and process returning echoes, to detect and track down small prey. Now, two new studies in the January 26th issue of Current Biology, a Cell Press publication, show that bats' and whales' remarkable ability and the high-frequency hearing it depends on are shared at a much deeper level than anyone would have anticipated"”all the way down to the molecular level. The discovery represents...

2010-01-13 13:42:00

PASADENA, Calif., Jan. 13 /PRNewswire/ -- This summer, the acclaimed, Oscar contender documentary THE COVE will make its world free television debut on Animal Planet. The film - which makes an undercover, stealth investigation into the culling and slaughter of thousands of dolphins in remote Taiji, Japan - uses an 'Oceans Eleven'-style approach, bringing to light the dark reality of dolphin massacre. Animal Planet will air the critically lauded documentary in the first exclusive window...

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2010-01-06 07:40:00

Scientists are now saying that there are actually two types of killer whales living in UK waters instead of just one, as was previously thought, according to BBC News. The whales are different from each other in both the way they look and the way they eat, and the males of one type are about 6-feet longer than the other. Researchers believe the killer whales could be at an early stage of becoming two separate species. The findings have been published by the international group of...

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2009-12-17 08:50:57

Conservation success depends on understanding feeding behavior Scientists in Scotland, Canada and the US have proposed a new method to identify priority areas for whale conservation. The team's findings, published in Animal Conservation, suggest that even small protected areas, identified through feeding behavior, can benefit highly mobile marine predators such as killer whales. "There are enormous challenges associated with setting conservation priorities for such mobile and migratory...

2009-11-24 10:03:25

Rocket science is opening new doors to understanding how sounds associated with Navy sonar might affect the hearing of a marine mammal "“ or if they hear it at all. The same type of large industrial sized X-ray scanners that NASA uses to detect flaws in the space shuttle's behemoth solid fuel rockets is now allowing scientists to peek inside the giant head of a whale. The scans are providing detailed three-dimensional replicas of a whale's hearing anatomy using a breakthrough method...

2009-09-28 06:55:00

CUMBERLAND, N.C., Sept. 28 /PRNewswire/ -- A new iPhone application offers dolphin enthusiasts, or any technophile with an appreciation for marine life, the chance to care for their own pet dolphins in an interactive underwater environment at any time of the day or night. Launched today by Quick Hitz Lab, Dolphin Experience (http://www.quick-hitz-lab.com/dolphin-experience.htm) uses vivid graphics and intuitive motion controls to create a realistic application that pushes the limits of the...


Latest Dolphin Reference Libraries

Indo-Pacific Bottlenose Dolphin, Tursiops aduncus
2013-09-19 11:24:25

The Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops aduncus) is one of three recognized species of bottlenose dolphin that can be found in the waters near southern Australia, South China, and India. Its range also includes the Red Sea and the eastern coastal areas of Africa. All bottlenose dolphins were classified as one species, the common bottlenose dolphin or T. truncates, until 1998 when the Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphin was found to be distinct. This species is distinct from other bottlenose...

Burrunan Dolphin, Tursiops australis
2013-09-19 11:08:29

The Burrunan dolphin (Tursiops australis) is one of three recognized species of bottlenose dolphin. It can be found in two areas of Victoria, Australia. One population can be found in the Gippsland Lakes, where about 50 reside, and one in Port Phillip, where about 100 individuals reside. Haplotypes of the Burrunan dolphin have been discovered in an area extending from the Spencer Gulf waters west to St. Francis Island. Because of its low numbers, it is thought to deserve protection from the...

Finless Porpoise, Neophocaena phocaenoides
2013-08-17 13:37:05

The finless porpoise (Neophocaena phocaenoides) can be found in the coastal waters of Asia. Its range includes China, Indonesia, Korea, India, Japan, and Bangladesh. Its western range extends from the coast if India to the Persian Gulf and a distinct freshwater subspecies resides in the Yangtze River. It prefers to reside in shallow areas along the shore, at depths of up to 160 feet. This population is isolated within its range. A few individuals have been found as far as 99 miles off the...

Hourglass Dolphin, Lagenorhynchus cruciger
2013-08-16 10:45:47

The hourglass dolphin (Lagenorhynchus cruciger) is a rare species that can be found in Antarctic and subAntarctic waters. Most sightings of this species have been made in the southern waters near the Shetland Islands, off the coast of Tierra del Fuego, Argentina, and in the southern waters near New Zealand. It is thought that this dolphin does not congregate in large numbers in any area of its circumpolar range. Qouy and Galmard first recognized the hourglass dolphin as a new species in...

Long-Beaked Common Dolphin, Delphinus capensis
2013-06-22 16:27:01

The long-beaked common dolphin (Delphinus capensis) is a species within the Delphinus, or common dolphin, genus that can be found in a fragmented range within tropical and warm temperate habitats. Its range includes western and southern areas of Africa, central California and Mexico, coastal regions of Peru, Taiwan, Korea, Japan, a large portion of western South America. The long-beaked common dolphin was not considered a distinct species until the 1990’s, along with all other species of...

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Word of the Day
cock-a-hoop
  • Exultant; jubilant; triumphant; on the high horse.
  • Tipsy; slightly intoxicated.
This word may come from the phrase 'to set cock on hoop,' or 'to drink festively.' Its origin otherwise is unclear. A theory, according to the Word Detective, is that it's a 'transliteration of the French phrase 'coq a huppe,' meaning a rooster displaying its crest ('huppe') in a pose of proud defiance.' Therefore, 'cock-a-hoop' would 'liken a drunken man to a boastful and aggressive rooster.'
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