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Latest Dolphin Stories

2008-12-30 07:51:00

CUMBRIA, England and FORT LAUDERDALE, Florida, December 30 /PRNewswire/ -- - Key Words: Dolphin, Cetacean, Acoustics, Holography, Language, CymaScope In an important breakthrough in deciphering dolphin language, researchers in Great Britain and the United States have imaged the first high definition imprints that dolphin sounds make in water. The key to this technique is the CymaScope, a new instrument that reveals detailed structures within sounds, allowing their...

2008-12-28 10:38:25

Cape Cod Stranding Network coordinator Sarah Herzig says 10 dolphins have been stranded on beaches in the Massachusetts region in recent days. Herzig said eight of the animals became stranded on beaches in the towns of Wellfleet and Brewster on Christmas Day, followed by two more dolphins on Wellfleet beaches a day later, the Cape Cod (Mass.) Times said Saturday. Three of the stranded dolphins died on the beaches, while a fourth was euthanized by rescuers. The remaining six dolphins were all...

2008-12-17 05:00:00

An animal welfare problem of major proportions has been uncovered in a new report by WDCS, the Whale and Dolphin Conservation Society. PLYMOUTH, Mass., Dec. 17 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- The report, Shrouded by the sea, reveals the shocking truth behind the entanglement of whales, dolphins and porpoises in fishing nets, estimated to kill more than 300,000 of these animals worldwide each year. The harrowing details of how whales and dolphins slowly meet their death in fishing nets, many...

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2008-12-15 13:25:00

Research suggests that the bizarre teeth of male beaked whales have evolved to help females choose their mates. Apparently, the males use the two teeth on the outside of their jaws not for eating, but for scratching each other. DNA analysis shows the teeth probably evolved as secondary sexual traits to help females select males of the right species, scientists said. Beaked whales make up the least known group of whales or dolphins. They spend most of their time deep in the ocean foraging for...

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2008-12-10 14:14:35

Marine biologists say that many female bottlenose dolphins in Western Australia's Shark Bay area spend a disproportionately large amount of time using sponges to root for prey on the ocean floor. They say this causes some dolphins to work longer hours than others for their food. Scientists say the female bottlenose dolphins living in 30- to 50-foot-deep channels off Australia's western coast that bury their noses in sponges and use them as tools to root through the sandy ocean floor for...

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2008-12-04 10:30:00

Man-made noise emitted in the seas and oceans is a huge risk to whales, dolphins and turtles that use sound to converse, find food and mate, wildlife experts announced on Wednesday.Reverberating ship engines, seismic surveys by oil and gas companies, and invasive military sonar is generating an "acoustic fog and cacophony of sounds" underwater, frightening marine animals and disturbing their natural behavior."There is now evidence linking loud underwater noises with some major strandings of...

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2008-11-25 11:50:00

Despite broad "dolphin safe" practices, fishing activities have continued to restrict the growth of at least one Pacific Ocean dolphin population, a new report led by a researcher at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego has concluded.Populations of dolphins in the Eastern Pacific were expected to increase in abundance after successful regulations and agreements were enacted to reduce dolphin deaths as a result of fishing "bycatch," cases in which animals are caught...

2008-11-24 17:03:48

Fishing activities are stunting population growth of a type of Pacific Ocean dolphin despite dolphin-safe practices, U.S. university researchers said. The study by Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California-San Diego revealed negative impacts from fishing activities remain, despite adoption of regulations and agreements designed to reduce dolphin deaths from by-catch in which animals are caught unintentionally along with the intended targets. The research by the...

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2008-11-24 13:50:00

A team of researchers has set out to calculate the power of a dolphin's thrust by using digital video and millions of tiny bubbles. In 1936, zoologist James Gray estimated that the drag dolphins must overcome to swim faster than 20 miles an hour. Gray said dolphins lacked the muscles to swim so fast, and yet they did. This is known as Gray's Paradox. Over the decades, scientists have found flaws in Gray's work, and most biologists have rejected his theory. "There is no paradox. The dolphins...

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2008-11-13 08:00:00

In a crushing defeat for environmentalists, the Supreme Court ruled on Wednesday the US Navy can conduct sonar training exercises off the southern California coast without restrictions designed to protect whales, dolphins and other marine mammals. The high court threw out a federal judge's injunction that had required the Navy to take precautions during submarine-hunting exercises. Environmental groups argued that the intense sound waves could harm or even kill 37 species of marine mammals,...


Latest Dolphin Reference Libraries

Indo-Pacific Bottlenose Dolphin, Tursiops aduncus
2013-09-19 11:24:25

The Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops aduncus) is one of three recognized species of bottlenose dolphin that can be found in the waters near southern Australia, South China, and India. Its range also includes the Red Sea and the eastern coastal areas of Africa. All bottlenose dolphins were classified as one species, the common bottlenose dolphin or T. truncates, until 1998 when the Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphin was found to be distinct. This species is distinct from other bottlenose...

Burrunan Dolphin, Tursiops australis
2013-09-19 11:08:29

The Burrunan dolphin (Tursiops australis) is one of three recognized species of bottlenose dolphin. It can be found in two areas of Victoria, Australia. One population can be found in the Gippsland Lakes, where about 50 reside, and one in Port Phillip, where about 100 individuals reside. Haplotypes of the Burrunan dolphin have been discovered in an area extending from the Spencer Gulf waters west to St. Francis Island. Because of its low numbers, it is thought to deserve protection from the...

Finless Porpoise, Neophocaena phocaenoides
2013-08-17 13:37:05

The finless porpoise (Neophocaena phocaenoides) can be found in the coastal waters of Asia. Its range includes China, Indonesia, Korea, India, Japan, and Bangladesh. Its western range extends from the coast if India to the Persian Gulf and a distinct freshwater subspecies resides in the Yangtze River. It prefers to reside in shallow areas along the shore, at depths of up to 160 feet. This population is isolated within its range. A few individuals have been found as far as 99 miles off the...

Hourglass Dolphin, Lagenorhynchus cruciger
2013-08-16 10:45:47

The hourglass dolphin (Lagenorhynchus cruciger) is a rare species that can be found in Antarctic and subAntarctic waters. Most sightings of this species have been made in the southern waters near the Shetland Islands, off the coast of Tierra del Fuego, Argentina, and in the southern waters near New Zealand. It is thought that this dolphin does not congregate in large numbers in any area of its circumpolar range. Qouy and Galmard first recognized the hourglass dolphin as a new species in...

Long-Beaked Common Dolphin, Delphinus capensis
2013-06-22 16:27:01

The long-beaked common dolphin (Delphinus capensis) is a species within the Delphinus, or common dolphin, genus that can be found in a fragmented range within tropical and warm temperate habitats. Its range includes western and southern areas of Africa, central California and Mexico, coastal regions of Peru, Taiwan, Korea, Japan, a large portion of western South America. The long-beaked common dolphin was not considered a distinct species until the 1990’s, along with all other species of...

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Word of the Day
toccata
  • In music, a work for a keyboard-instrument, like the pianoforte or organ, originally intended to utilize and display varieties of touch: but the term has been extended so as to include many irregular works, similar to the prelude, the fantasia, and the improvisation.
This word is Italian in origin, coming from the feminine past participle of 'toccare,' to touch.
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