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Latest Domestication Stories

2014-06-24 09:37:19

Princeton University While African wildlife often run afoul of ranchers and pastoralists securing food and water resources for their animals, the interests of fauna and farmer might finally be unified by the "Sodom apple," a toxic invasive plant that has overrun vast swaths of East African savanna and pastureland. Should the ominous reference to the smitten biblical city be unclear, the Sodom apple, or Solanum campylacanthum, is a wicked plant. Not a true apple, this relative of the...

fossil dog with mammoth bone in mouth
2014-05-30 09:14:16

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Scientists have long-suspected that our ancestors were at least partially to blame for the extinction of the mammoth and a new research review from a Penn State anthropologist has revealed that ancient humans may have had an accomplice – domesticated dogs. The new study, published in the journal Quaternary International, is based on past examinations of European archeological sites with large numbers of mammoth remains. Study author...

Genetic Study Tackles Slow Plant Domestication Mystery
2014-04-18 08:06:55

By Diana Lutz, Washington University in St. Louis Domestication genes tend to be insensitive to the rest of the genome and to the environment. Could finding this subset of robust genes have slowed things down? “The Modern View of Domestication,” a special feature of The Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) published April 29, raises a number of startling questions about a transition in our deep history that most of us take for granted. At the end of the last Ice...

Wild And Domestic Animals Interbred Until Quite Recently
2014-04-18 04:48:07

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Previous theories have posited that domesticated animals have been cut off from their wild counterparts, but a new study slated for publication in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences journal has found that wild and domestic animals have interbred more than previously thought. "Our findings show little control of breeding, particularly of domestic females, and indicate long-term gene flow, or interbreeding, between...

Study Finds Recent Wolf-dog Hybridization In Caucasus Region
2014-04-14 15:50:55

American Genetic Association Dog owners in the Caucasus Mountains of Georgia might want to consider penning up their dogs more often: hybridization of wolves with shepherd dogs might be more common, and more recent, than previously thought, according to a recently published study in the Journal of Heredity (DOI: 10.1093/jhered/esu014). Dr. Natia Kopaliani, Dr. David Tarkhnishvili, and colleagues from the Institute of Ecology at Ilia State University in Georgia and from the Tbilisi Zoo...

Archaeologists Pinpoint Date When Domesticated Camels Arrived In Israel
2014-02-04 04:51:43

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online According to Tel Aviv University researchers, camels were not domesticated in Israel until between 2000 and 1500 BCE. The latest study challenges biblical stories of Abraham, Joseph, and Jacob, which tell how camels were used as pack animals. The researchers say that this discovery proves this text was written well after the events described. The team from the university’s Department of Archaeology and Near Eastern Cultures used...

Wolves Learn From Each Other Better Than Dogs
2014-01-31 07:52:25

University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna Although wolves and dogs are closely related, they show some striking differences. Scientists from the Messerli Research Institute at the University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna have undertaken experiments that suggest that wolves observe one another more closely than dogs and so are better at learning from one another. The scientists believe that cooperation among wolves is the basis of the understanding between dogs and humans. Their findings...

Cat Domestication Started In China
2013-12-17 10:31:08

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online According to new research published Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, cats were drawn to human settlements near the ancient Chinese village of Quanhucun more than 5,000 years ago, a development which may have eventually led to their domestication. "Our data suggest that cats were attracted to ancient farming villages by small animals, such as rodents that were living on the grain that the farmers grew, ate...

DNA Analysis Indicates Domesticated Dogs Originated In Europe
2013-11-15 07:00:03

[ Watch the Video: Where Did Dogs Really Come From? ] redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online An extensive genetic analysis of ancient canines, modern dogs and wolves suggests that the domesticated animal now known as “man’s best friend” originated in Europe at least 18,000 years ago. According to the Associated Press (AP), the researchers examined the DNA of 18 different wolf-like and dog-like specimens that lived in Argentina, Belgium, Germany, Russia,...

israeli wild boar from europe
2013-11-05 08:15:10

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Whether in Israel or elsewhere, wild boars look pretty much the same: stocky and hairy with large heads, long snouts, and beady eyes. Because of this, scientists had no reason to think that wild boars in Israel were any different than their other Middle Eastern counterparts, from Egypt to Iran. A new study published in Scientific Reports, however, reveals that unlike the Near Eastern wild boars in surrounding countries, Israel's wild...


Latest Domestication Reference Libraries

Wild Horse, Equus ferus
2014-04-11 11:56:13

The Wild Horse (Equus ferus) is a species of the genus Equus, which includes as subspecies the modern domesticated horse as well as the undomesticated Tarpan, now extinct, and the endangered Przewalski’s horse. The Przewalski’s Horse was saved from the edge of extinction and reintroduced with success in the wild. The Tarpan became extinct during the 19th century, although it was a possible ancestor of the domestic horse, and roamed the steppes of Eurasia at the time of domestication....

Animal husbandry
2013-08-21 10:25:40

Animal husbandry is the caring and breeding of domestic animals by humans, such as cattle, pigs, sheep and horses. Animal husbandry includes grooming, accommodations, and hygiene of the animals. Animal husbandry may also consist of specialized breeding in order to obtain a desirable characteristic, such as strength, temperament, increased production of by-products, or bone structure of the intended animal. Farmers, ranchers, and sheepherders practice animal husbandry as well as those who take...

Alpaca, Vicugna pacos
2012-10-27 17:12:26

The alpaca (Vicugna pacos) is a South American camelid that is similar in appearance to the llama. Its range includes the Andes Mountains, in areas of Ecuador, northern Bolivia and Chile, and southern Peru. It is a domesticated animal that is kept in herds in flat, grassy areas at altitudes of up to 16,000 feet. For many years there was confusion concerning the classification of the four species of South American lamoids, including the alpaca. Until 2001, it was accepted that this species...

Llama, Lama glama
2012-09-19 14:36:11

Llama, Lama glama The llama (Lama glama) is a domesticated camelid from South America. It is often used as a pack animal or for meat by Andean cultures. Its hair is used to make clothing and handicrafts. The course outer hair is typically used to make lead ropes, rugs, and wall hangings, and the fibers can come in many colors ranging from black to reddish brown to white. Because of transportation and trade of this species, there are now more than 158,000 llamas and 100,000 alpacas in...

42_87576d126e67641e277961fcbb9c4b85
2007-08-14 12:56:55

The Bactrian camel (Camelus bactrianus), is a large even-toed ungulate native to the steppes of eastern Asia. The Bactrian camel has two humps on its back, in contrast to the Dromedary, also known as the Arabian camel, which has one. For a memory aid the B of Bactrian can be imagined as a graphic of two humps and the D of Dromedary can be imagined as a graphic of one hump. Nearly all of the estimated 1.4 million Bactrian Camels alive today are domesticated, but in October 2002 the...

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Word of the Day
callithump
  • A somewhat riotous parade, accompanied with the blowing of tin horns, and other discordant noises; also, a burlesque serenade; a charivari.
'Callithump' is a back-formation of 'callithumpian,' a 'fanciful formation' according to the Oxford English Dictionary. However, the English Dialect Dictionary, says 'Gallithumpians' is a Dorset and Devon word from the 1790s that refers to 'a society of radical social reformers' or 'noisy disturbers of elections and meetings.'
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