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Last updated on April 23, 2014 at 21:24 EDT
Genetic Study Tackles Slow Plant Domestication Mystery

Genetic Study Tackles Slow Plant Domestication Mystery

By Diana Lutz, Washington University in St. Louis Domestication genes tend to be insensitive to the rest of the genome and to the environment. Could finding this subset of robust genes have slowed things down? “The Modern View of...

Latest Domestication Stories

Archaeologists Pinpoint Date When Domesticated Camels Arrived In Israel
2014-02-04 04:51:43

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online According to Tel Aviv University researchers, camels were not domesticated in Israel until between 2000 and 1500 BCE. The latest study challenges biblical stories of Abraham, Joseph, and Jacob, which tell how camels were used as pack animals. The researchers say that this discovery proves this text was written well after the events described. The team from the university’s Department of Archaeology and Near Eastern Cultures used...

Wolves Learn From Each Other Better Than Dogs
2014-01-31 07:52:25

University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna Although wolves and dogs are closely related, they show some striking differences. Scientists from the Messerli Research Institute at the University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna have undertaken experiments that suggest that wolves observe one another more closely than dogs and so are better at learning from one another. The scientists believe that cooperation among wolves is the basis of the understanding between dogs and humans. Their findings...

Cat Domestication Started In China
2013-12-17 10:31:08

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online According to new research published Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, cats were drawn to human settlements near the ancient Chinese village of Quanhucun more than 5,000 years ago, a development which may have eventually led to their domestication. "Our data suggest that cats were attracted to ancient farming villages by small animals, such as rodents that were living on the grain that the farmers grew, ate...

DNA Analysis Indicates Domesticated Dogs Originated In Europe
2013-11-15 07:00:03

[ Watch the Video: Where Did Dogs Really Come From? ] redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online An extensive genetic analysis of ancient canines, modern dogs and wolves suggests that the domesticated animal now known as “man’s best friend” originated in Europe at least 18,000 years ago. According to the Associated Press (AP), the researchers examined the DNA of 18 different wolf-like and dog-like specimens that lived in Argentina, Belgium, Germany, Russia,...

israeli wild boar from europe
2013-11-05 08:15:10

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Whether in Israel or elsewhere, wild boars look pretty much the same: stocky and hairy with large heads, long snouts, and beady eyes. Because of this, scientists had no reason to think that wild boars in Israel were any different than their other Middle Eastern counterparts, from Egypt to Iran. A new study published in Scientific Reports, however, reveals that unlike the Near Eastern wild boars in surrounding countries, Israel's wild...

Elephants Understand Human Pointing
2013-10-11 09:43:14

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Elephants are able to grasp the concept of human pointing, even without receiving any how-to instructions, according to new research appearing in the latest edition of the journal Current Biology. According to Discovery News, this latest find indicates just how intelligent the pachyderms are, since even the great apes, which include species like chimps and gorillas and are far more genetically similar to humans, often struggles...

2013-10-02 12:24:16

Over the past few decades, crop breeders have increasingly relied on the wild and weedy relatives of domesticated crops as new sources of disease resistance, drought tolerance, and other traits. But just like all wild plant species, these "crop wild relatives" (CWR) are also at risk of decline and extinction due to habitat loss, pollution, and climate change. On Wednesday, Nov. 6, 2013, two speakers will describe the latest efforts to identify and protect the wild relatives of domesticated...

Hunter Gatherers Had Pigs
2013-08-27 13:49:52

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Hunter-gatherers living in Europe around 4600 BC may have had domesticated pigs thanks to incoming Neolithic farmers, according to a new report in the journal Nature Communications. Authors of the report point to evidence of interactions and an exchange of animals between established hunter-gatherer communities and proliferating farming communities around 6,600 years ago. The relationships eventually led to the hunter-gatherers...

Farmers Increasingly Plagued By 'Weedy' Strains Of Rice
2013-07-18 12:36:46

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Over the past decade or so the de-domestication of rice has increasingly plagued farmer's fields, with "weedy" strains of the grain cutting agricultural yields by as much as 80 percent. Being domesticated thousands of years ago in both Africa and Asia, the de-domestication of rice also provided an interesting case study for two biologists at Washington University in St. Louis who recently published a genetic analysis of both types of...

Ancient Canine Remains Closer To Domesticated Dogs Than Wolves
2013-03-07 11:53:50

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online A recent genetic analysis has shown that a 33,000-year-old canine skull found in Siberia is more closely related to today´s domestic dogs than the wolves of its time, according to a report in the online journal PLOS ONE. The finding could have major implications for understanding how modern day labradoodles and peekapoos were bred from wild dogs over thousands of years. The skull was first found in 1975 by a team of Russian...


Latest Domestication Reference Libraries

Wild Horse, Equus ferus
2014-04-11 11:56:13

The Wild Horse (Equus ferus) is a species of the genus Equus, which includes as subspecies the modern domesticated horse as well as the undomesticated Tarpan, now extinct, and the endangered Przewalski’s horse. The Przewalski’s Horse was saved from the edge of extinction and reintroduced with success in the wild. The Tarpan became extinct during the 19th century, although it was a possible ancestor of the domestic horse, and roamed the steppes of Eurasia at the time of domestication....

Animal husbandry
2013-08-21 10:25:40

Animal husbandry is the caring and breeding of domestic animals by humans, such as cattle, pigs, sheep and horses. Animal husbandry includes grooming, accommodations, and hygiene of the animals. Animal husbandry may also consist of specialized breeding in order to obtain a desirable characteristic, such as strength, temperament, increased production of by-products, or bone structure of the intended animal. Farmers, ranchers, and sheepherders practice animal husbandry as well as those who take...

Alpaca, Vicugna pacos
2012-10-27 17:12:26

The alpaca (Vicugna pacos) is a South American camelid that is similar in appearance to the llama. Its range includes the Andes Mountains, in areas of Ecuador, northern Bolivia and Chile, and southern Peru. It is a domesticated animal that is kept in herds in flat, grassy areas at altitudes of up to 16,000 feet. For many years there was confusion concerning the classification of the four species of South American lamoids, including the alpaca. Until 2001, it was accepted that this species...

Llama, Lama glama
2012-09-19 14:36:11

Llama, Lama glama The llama (Lama glama) is a domesticated camelid from South America. It is often used as a pack animal or for meat by Andean cultures. Its hair is used to make clothing and handicrafts. The course outer hair is typically used to make lead ropes, rugs, and wall hangings, and the fibers can come in many colors ranging from black to reddish brown to white. Because of transportation and trade of this species, there are now more than 158,000 llamas and 100,000 alpacas in...

42_87576d126e67641e277961fcbb9c4b85
2007-08-14 12:56:55

The Bactrian camel (Camelus bactrianus), is a large even-toed ungulate native to the steppes of eastern Asia. The Bactrian camel has two humps on its back, in contrast to the Dromedary, also known as the Arabian camel, which has one. For a memory aid the B of Bactrian can be imagined as a graphic of two humps and the D of Dromedary can be imagined as a graphic of one hump. Nearly all of the estimated 1.4 million Bactrian Camels alive today are domesticated, but in October 2002 the...

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