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Latest Douglas A. Melton Stories

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2008-08-28 09:05:00

Scientists have successfully changed the identity of one type of cell into another in living mice, potentially paving the way for new developments in the growth of replacement tissues used to treat a broad spectrum of diseases. Researchers were able to transform ordinary pancreas cells into a rare type that creates insulin, which may provide future help for those who suffer from diabetes. What's more, scientists say this development could reach much further than possible treatments for...

2008-08-28 06:00:10

By Dan Vergano Call it "Extreme Makeover, the Cellular Edition." A team of biologists has turned mouse pancreas tissue into specialized cells, the same ones that go missing in juvenile diabetes. The mouse study, led by Qiao Zhou of the Harvard Stem Cell Institute, opens a new avenue to "regenerative medicine," in which physicians remake patient cells into tissues that can be used to treat diabetes and heart and brain ailments. "We 'flipped' the cells from one state to another," says...

2008-08-08 15:00:00

By ELIE DOLGIN and MARK JOHNSON Harvard scientists have reprogrammed the cells of patients with various genetic illnesses back to an embryonic state, creating a bank of cells that researchers can use to study and fight disease. The 20 new cell lines span 10 different diseases and conditions, including Parkinson's and Down syndrome. They will offer scientists the chance to watch diseases progress in a laboratory dish and give researchers new targets for drugs. These and other cells...

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2008-08-08 13:15:00

Scientists at Harvard have successfully created stem cells for 10 genetic disorders by using a new technique. Researchers say this will allow them an unprecedented change to watch the diseases develop in a lab dish, which could speed up efforts to find treatments for disorders that are hard to treat. Writing in the journal Cell, researchers said they plan to make the cell lines readily available to other scientists. Dr. George Daley and his colleagues at the Harvard Stem Cell Institute used...

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2006-06-06 11:20:00

BOSTON -- Stepping into a research area marked by controversy and fraud, Harvard University scientists said Tuesday they are trying to clone human embryos to create stem cells they hope can be used one day to help conquer a host of diseases. "We are convinced that work with embryonic stem cells holds enormous promise," said Harvard provost Dr. Steven Hyman. The privately funded work is aimed at devising treatments for such ailments as diabetes, Lou Gehrig's disease, sickle-cell anemia and...

2006-02-17 18:30:00

BOSTON (Reuters) - Harvard University said on Friday it would break ground next year on a 500,000-square-foot (46,450-square-metre) complex for stem cell research as part of the Ivy League school's push to stay a leader in the field. "Moving forward with this complex means planting a stake in the ground, from which we will advance this potentially life-saving science," Douglas Melton, co-director of Harvard's Stem Cell Institute, said in a statement. Stem cells are the body's master cells,...

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2005-09-08 14:50:00

What exactly makes a stem cell a stem cell? The question may seem simplistic, but while we know a great deal of what stem cells can do, we don't yet understand the molecular processes that afford them such unique attributes. Now, researchers at Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research working with human embryonic stem cells have uncovered the process responsible for the single-most tantalizing characteristic of these cells: their ability to become just about any type of cell in the body,...

2005-08-22 14:10:30

Researchers have developed a new technique for creating human embryonic stem cells by fusing adult somatic cells with embryonic stem cells. The fusion causes the adult cells to undergo genetic reprogramming, which results in cells that have the developmental characteristics of human embryonic stem cells. This approach could become an alternative to somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT), a method that is currently used to produce human stem cells. SCNT involves transferring the nuclei of adult...

2005-08-22 10:30:00

By Maggie Fox, Health and Science Correspondent WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Scientists have created a new human embryonic stem cell from an ordinary skin cell, U.S. researchers said on Monday. They hope their method, which fuses an embryonic stem cell to an ordinary skin cell and bone cells, could someday provide tailor-made medical treatments without having to start from scratch using cloning technology. That would also mean generating the valuable cells without using a human egg, and without...


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