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Latest Douglas-fir Stories

ec5e068377cfe13dc8488f6788f94d52
2010-04-05 14:52:44

The Swiss needle cast epidemic in Douglas-fir forests of the coastal Pacific Northwest is continuing to intensify, appears to be unprecedented over at least the past 100 years, and is probably linked to the extensive planting of Douglas-fir along the coast and a warmer climate, new research concludes. Scientists in the College of Forestry at Oregon State University have also found that this disease, which is affecting hundreds of thousands of acres in Oregon and Washington and costing tens of...

2008-12-15 12:32:15

Two U.S. researchers advise consumers to think twice about spending money on a commercial flame retardant for a Christmas tree. Drs. Gary Chastagner of Washington State University's Puyallup Research Center and Eric Hinesley of North Carolina State University, tested two flame retardants on Douglas-fir and Fraser fir, and neither showed any benefit to the trees. Many cities and municipalities require that chemical flame retardants be used on cut Christmas trees displayed in public buildings....

34c9ffe4df7ee72855277a046a15b73d1
2008-12-12 15:20:00

Economical and easy way to keep trees green: Water works best This Christmas season, think twice about spending money on a commercial flame retardant for your Christmas tree. The good, old-fashioned method"”keeping your tree in a container of fresh water"”is probably all you need to keep your tree green and healthy. Researchers have determined that some flame retardants don't work on cut Christmas trees; in fact, in several cases the chemical retardants sped up the drying process...

2008-08-22 18:00:25

Five tall trees in a Seattle park have been deliberately killed with an injection of an herbicide, and two more are turning brown, officials said. The Seattle Parks and Recreation Department reported Thursday that holes had been driven into the trunks of the 70-foot-tall silver poplars and Douglas firs, the Seattle Post-Intelligencer reported. The poison killed the poplars and two of the firs, while the other firs are turning brown. The trees were planted about 30 years ago, said Mark...

1003ffeb925291cd4b6739c8eb285a511
2005-12-23 00:30:00

Conifers such as Christmas trees suffer a severe plumbing problem. The "pipes" that carry water through firs, pines and other conifers are 10 times shorter than those in flowering trees. But a University of Utah study suggests why conifers not only survive but thrive: efficient microscopic valves let water flow through conifers about as easily as it flows through other trees. "When you are sitting around and admiring your Christmas tree, consider that it owes its existence in part to this...


Latest Douglas-fir Reference Libraries

RedTreeVole23
2012-04-02 20:40:25

The Red Tree Vole, (Arborimus longicaudus), is a species of rodent found only in the United States. It is found in the upper branches of arboreal conifers throughout northern California and western Oregon. The preferred habitat is Douglas Fir or Redwood species. The Red Tree Vole often spends its whole life in just one tree, and often, many generations will live in different parts of the same tree. The adult is about 6 to 8 inches long, including the tail. The coat is reddish-brown.

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Word of the Day
barghest
  • A goblin in English folklore, often appearing in the shape of a large dog and believed to portend imminent death or misfortune.
  • A ghost, wraith, hobgoblin, elf, or spirit.
The origin of 'barghest' is not known, but it may be from perhaps burh-ghest, town-ghost, or German Berg-geist (mountain spirit) or Bär-geist (bear-spirit).
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