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Latest Dropsonde Stories

NASA's HS3 Hurricane Mission Wraps Up For 2013
2013-12-03 09:21:01

NASA NASA's Hurricane and Severe Storms Sentinel airborne mission known as HS3 wrapped up for the 2013 Atlantic Ocean hurricane season at the end of September, and had several highlights. HS3 will return to NASA’s Wallops Flight Facility in Wallops Island, Va., for the 2014 Atlantic hurricane season. During the 2013 mission, two unmanned Global Hawks flew from Wallops for the first time. The mission highlights included studying the Saharan Air Layer, following the genesis of a...

Tropical Storm Humberto's Hybrid Core Revealed By NASA HS3 Mission
2013-09-20 14:18:03

NASA NASA's Global Hawk 872 flew over Tropical Storm Humberto on Sept. 16 and 17 after it was reborn from remnants of its earlier life cycle. Data from NASA 872 showed that the core had a hybrid structure. NASA's Global Hawk 872 unmanned aircraft took off at 10:42 a.m. EDT from NASA's Wallops Flight Facility, Wallops Island, Va., Sept. 16 to investigate newly reformed Tropical Storm Humberto. NASA 872 dispersed dropsondes throughout Humberto and gathered data on the environment of the...

Tropical Storm Gabrielle Forecasting With The Help Of NASA Global Hawk
2013-09-07 05:02:45

[ Watch the Video: NASA’s Global Hawk Aircraft and the Dropsonde System ] April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online One of NASA’s Global Hawk unmanned aircraft recently dispersed dropsondes, which are expendable weather reconnaissance devices designed to accurately measure tropical storm conditions as the device falls from an aircraft to the ground. Data from those dropsondes assisted forecasters at the National Hurricane Center (NHC) when analyzing the environment of...

Using 'Dropsondes' To Get Detailed Weather Information
2013-08-27 11:40:51

NASA We’re planning to fly over the vast Atlantic with our Global Hawk - once again looking at the dust and dry air from the Sahara. Takeoff on Saturday morning and landing on Sunday morning. We’ll fly from Wallops to a point near the Cape Verde Islands (just off of Africa) and back in about 25 hours. It took Columbus 5 weeks to sail from the Canary Islands to the New World! One of our key instruments is called the Airborne Vertical Atmospheric Profiling System or AVAPS.  Actually,...

Distorted GPS Measure Hurricane Winds
2013-07-15 16:23:45

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Truck drivers and commuters rely on GPS technology to get themselves where they need to go in the shortest amount of time. During massive storms, these GPS signals can be buffeted by storm conditions. Now, scientists have figured out how to measure wind speeds based on these disruptions, according to a new study in the journal Radio Science. The research team from NASA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) said...

Two Hurricane Global Hawks Take To The Sky
2012-08-17 15:46:52

NASA's Hurricane Severe Storm Sentinel Mission, or HS3, will be studying hurricanes at the end of the summer, and there will be two high-altitude, long-duration unmanned aircraft with different instruments flying over the storms. The unmanned aircraft, dubbed "severe storm sentinels," are operated by pilots located in ground control stations at NASA's Wallops Flight Facility in Wallops Island, Va., and NASA's Dryden Flight Center on Edwards Air Base, Calif. The NASA Global Hawk is...

Image 1 - Global Hawks Prepare For 2012 Hurricane Study
2011-09-16 08:07:13

  A group of environmental scientists has set up an office in an aircraft hangar at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center at Edwards, Calif., in preparation for a multi-year airborne science investigation of hurricane formation and intensification. As they work on their computers, the scientists are also monitoring the installation and testing of specialized weather-monitoring instruments on one of NASA's Global Hawk remotely operated unmanned aircraft. This hands-on approach to...

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2010-07-29 09:37:46

Researchers will fly into tropical weather disturbances and observe their transition into tropical storms Summer storms are a regular feature in the North Atlantic, and while most pose little threat to our shores, a choice few become devastating hurricanes. To decipher which storms could bring danger, and which will not, atmospheric scientists are heading to the tropics to observe these systems as they form and dissipate--or develop into hurricanes. By learning to identify which weather...

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2008-05-26 16:10:00

In an effort to learn more about giant storms, U.S. researchers are using unmanned, remote-controlled airplanes this year to penetrate the heart of Atlantic hurricanes.However, for fear of endangering other planes, American aviation authorities have forced the rugged drones to be flown from the eastern Caribbean island of Barbados.The drones look just like hobbyists' model airplanes but can be controlled by satellites. Storm researchers are confident the drones will give them a more complete...