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Latest Droseraceae Stories

Carnivorous Plants Turning Vegetarian
2012-06-15 06:38:40

It´s a bad sign when even carnivorous plants decide to embrace a vegetarian lifestyle. A newly published study in New Phytologist journal has revealed the common Sundew plant is becoming so full from snacking on nitrogen deposits in Swedish bogs, that they´re eating fewer bugs. These bogs are normally scant in the way of nitrogen, therefore the plants have taken to snacking on insects to supplement their diet. However, as human activities (such as industrialization and other...

Scientists Discover New Carnivorous Plant In Brazil
2012-01-10 14:02:11

In the kind of discovery seldom seen in modern biology, scientists say they have discovered a carnivorous Brazilian plant that uses sticky, subterranean leaves to catch and digest worms–an evolutionary strategy for acquiring nutrients that has never before been observed in the plant kingdom. Researchers say that the rare plant, known to scientists as Philcoxia minensis, has only been found in a handful of increasingly rare savannah regions in inland Brazil. In a report of their...

2010-08-18 02:54:25

Why do some insect-eating plants like sundews keep their flowers so far away from their traps? New research suggests that it isn't a clever trick to keep pollinators safe, it's about getting pollinated Sex can be complicated at the best of times, but plants have an extra difficulty. If you're a plant who relies on insects to pollinate your flowers and reproduce, you will want your flowerstalks to be long. That way your flowers are on display to insects above the crowd. But if your stalk is...

2010-08-04 13:46:57

Charles Darwin described the Venus Flytrap as 'one of the most wonderful plants in the world.' It's also one of the fastest as many an unfortunate insect taking a stroll across a leaf has discovered. But what powers this speed? Dr Andrej Pavlovič of Comenius University, Slovakia, has been studying the plants with the help of some specialised equipment and a few unlucky insects. In the wild the Venus Flytrap grows in the bogs and savannahs of North and South...

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2009-07-20 13:25:00

Scientists have traced the origin of the Venus flytrap and another predatory plant back to a single ancestor with sticky leaves. Botanists told BBC Earth News that the plants' evolution was a result of the need to devour larger animals. This evolution caused the plants to develop new forms of weapons, including teeth and sensor hairs. There are several plants known to man that hunt prey using an array of tools. Scientists focused on the Venus flytrap and the waterwheel plant. The waterwheel...

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2008-10-06 07:35:00

These days, the venus flytrap is more vulnerable than ever and despite its popularity, the people who could protect it seem focused on other problems. One of nature's most recognized wonders, the venus flytrap's ability to snatch living prey makes it a favorite fascination of school-aged children everywhere. The flytrap's natural habitat is located within a hundred miles of the Carolinas' coast, where much larger and more territorial plants have always held forth. However, booming growth and...

2006-11-28 06:00:19

By Yesson, C; Culham, A Abstract.- We investigate the impact of past climates on plant diversification by tracking the "footprint" of climate change on a phylogenetic tree. Diversity within the cosmopolitan carnivorous plant genus Drosera (Droseraceae) is focused within Mediterranean climate regions. We explore whether this diversity is temporally linked to Mediterranean-type climatic shifts of the mid-Miocene and whether climate preferences are conservative over phylogenetic timescales....


Word of the Day
sough
  • A murmuring sound; a rushing or whistling sound, like that of the wind; a deep sigh.
  • A gentle breeze; a waft; a breath.
  • Any rumor that engages general attention.
  • A cant or whining mode of speaking, especially in preaching or praying; the chant or recitative characteristic of the old Presbyterians in Scotland.
  • To make a rushing, whistling, or sighing sound; emit a hollow murmur; murmur or sigh like the wind.
  • To breathe in or as in sleep.
  • To utter in a whining or monotonous tone.
According to the OED, from the 16th century, this word is 'almost exclusively Scots and northern dialect until adopted in general literary use in the 19th.'
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