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Latest Drosophila melanogaster Stories

Studying Fruit Flies On The International Space Station
2014-07-09 03:40:57

[ Watch The Video: ScienceCasts: Fruit Flies On The International Space Station ] Dr. Tony Phillips, Science@NASA Fruit flies are bug eyed and spindly, they love rotten bananas, and, following orders from their pin-sized brains, they can lay hundreds of eggs every day. We have a lot in common. Genetically speaking, people and fruit flies are surprisingly alike, explains biologist Sharmila Bhattacharya of NASA's Ames Research Center. "About 77% of known human disease genes...

Fruit fly study shows Hypergravity may help mitigate biological problems in space
2014-07-01 03:55:42

[ Watch The Video: ScienceCasts: Fruit Flies On The International Space Station ] Laura Niles, NASA Before you swat away the next fruit fly, consider instead just how similar its biological complexities are to our own. In a study published in PLOS ONE, researchers led by Deborah Kimbrell, Ph.D., at the University of California, Davis (UC Davis) and their collaborators, studied how microorganisms may alter fruit flies’ immunity in space and in hypergravity, or increased gravity. The...

2014-03-27 13:10:03

Gene encodes protein that regulates formation and maintenance of muscle tissue Skeletal muscle cells with unevenly spaced nuclei, or nuclei in the wrong location, are telltale signs of such inherited muscle diseases as Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy, which occurs in one out of every 100,000 births, and centronuclear myopathy, which affects one out of every 50,000 infants. What goes wrong during myogenesis, the formation and maintenance of muscle tissue, to produce these inherited...

Fruit Flies That Have Better Sex Lives Live Longer
2013-11-29 07:07:59

University of Michigan Health System Can sexual frustration be bad for your health? Male fruit flies that expected sex -- and didn't get it -- experienced serious health consequences and aged faster Sex may in fact be one of the secrets to good health, youth and a longer life – at least for fruit flies – suggests a new University of Michigan study that appears in the journal Science. Male fruit flies that perceived sexual pheromones of their female counterparts – without the...

Cell Migration Study Provides Insights Into The Movement Of Cancer Cells
2013-11-21 11:24:35

IRB Barcelona Using Drosophila melanogaster, researchers at IRB Barcelona discover that during multiple cell migrations a single cell can act as leader, dragging the others with it. The migration of groups of cells in order to form tissues is common during the development of an organism. Discovering how these multiple movements are achieved is not only crucial to understand the basic principles of development but provides new information and insights for further research into processes...

2013-11-19 17:00:07

Why do crosses between closely related species fail to produce fertile hybrids? A new study shows that differences in the levels - not necessarily the sequences - of certain key proteins are crucial in mediating reproductive isolation. Two individuals are defined as belonging to the same biological species, if matings between them give rise to viable and fertile offspring. Crosses between closely related, but already distinct, species produce hybrid offspring that are either inviable or...

2013-09-30 15:57:49

A team at IRB Barcelona identifies an essential protein for embryonic viability during the first cell divisions in the fly Drosophila. This protein, called dBigH1, which is a variant of histone 1, could also be associated with fertility issues. A zygote is the first cell of a new individual that comes about as the result of the fusion of an ovule with a spermatozoid. The DNA of the zygote holds all the information required to generate an adult organism. However, in the first stages of...

2013-09-25 10:56:18

Male fruit flies like to have a variety of sexual partners, whereas females prefer to stick with the same mate – or move on to his brothers. An Oxford University study of mating preferences in fruit flies (Drosophila) has found that males and females respond to the sexual familiarity of potential mates in fundamentally different ways. While male fruit flies preferred to court an unknown female over their previous mate or her sisters, female fruit flies displayed a predilection for...

Study Shows Fruit Fly Ideal Model To Study Hearing Loss In People
2013-09-03 08:05:09

University of Iowa If your attendance at too many rock concerts has impaired your hearing, listen up. University of Iowa researchers say that the common fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, is an ideal model to study hearing loss in humans caused by loud noise. The reason: The molecular underpinnings to its hearing are roughly the same as with people. As a result, scientists may choose to use the fruit fly to quicken the pace of research into the cause of noise-induced hearing loss...

FruitFliesSaltIntake_061413
2013-06-14 10:21:40

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online It´s a natural instinct to want to swat a fruit fly in your kitchen, but a group of researchers led by UC Santa Barbara´s Department of Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology (MCDB) and the Neuroscience Research Institute (NRI) say don´t. According to their new study, that fly could have a major impact on our progress in deciphering sensory biology and animal behavior. And that might someday provide a better...


Word of the Day
sough
  • A murmuring sound; a rushing or whistling sound, like that of the wind; a deep sigh.
  • A gentle breeze; a waft; a breath.
  • Any rumor that engages general attention.
  • A cant or whining mode of speaking, especially in preaching or praying; the chant or recitative characteristic of the old Presbyterians in Scotland.
  • To make a rushing, whistling, or sighing sound; emit a hollow murmur; murmur or sigh like the wind.
  • To breathe in or as in sleep.
  • To utter in a whining or monotonous tone.
According to the OED, from the 16th century, this word is 'almost exclusively Scots and northern dialect until adopted in general literary use in the 19th.'
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