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Latest Drosophila melanogaster Stories

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2006-06-26 14:45:00

Thousands of tiny fruit flies soon will journey into space to help NASA scientists better understand changes in the human immune system caused by space flight. Despite differences in size and complexity, the Drosophila melanogaster, or common fruit fly, may help scientists from NASA Ames Research Center unlock the secrets of why astronauts often develop changes in their immune system during space flight. The experiment will be part of the STS-121 space shuttle mission tentatively scheduled...

2005-10-31 12:59:07

ATLANTA -- Researchers at Emory University School of Medicine and their colleagues have discovered a genetic mechanism that controls cellular growth in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, and believe it likely that a similar system may be at work in normal and cancerous human cells. The findings appear in the November issue of the journal Developmental Cell. Ken Moberg, PhD, assistant professor of cell biology at Emory University School of Medicine, is the lead and corresponding author of...

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2005-10-19 12:55:00

Genetic material derisively called "junk" DNA because it does not contain the instructions for protein-coding genes and appears to have little or no function is actually critically important to an organism's evolutionary survival, according to a study conducted by a biologist at UCSD. In the October 20 issue of Nature, Peter Andolfatto, an assistant professor of biology at UCSD, shows that these non-coding regions play an important role in maintaining an organism's genetic integrity. In his...

2005-10-03 15:10:00

CHAMPAIGN, Ill. -- The first close-up look at a pro-inflammatory signaling molecule involved in immune response in mammals suggests that researchers "should rethink what they are doing" in creating drugs based on a fruit-fly model, scientists say. Reporting in the Oct. 1 issue of the Journal of Immunology, researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign unveiled the crystal structure of mouse interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase-4 (IRAK-4). They found a distinct highly...

2005-07-11 23:30:00

Ever wondered why you aren't able to swat a fly? The fly's secret in avoiding death in this way lies in its decision to jump rather than to fly out of the way. "This kind of low-power decision-making could be of interest to those building autonomously navigating robots", according to Gwyneth Card of the California Institute of Technology, who will be presenting her work on triggered escape response at the Society for Experimental Biology Annual Main Meeting in Barcelona, on Wednesday 13th...

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2005-06-15 18:45:00

CORVALLIS, Ore. -- New research has shown that the manipulation of a single gene in female fruit flies can make their sexual behavior resemble that of males, in a study that demonstrates the power of individual genes and the profound impact of genetics on complex sexual behavior. The findings were published today in the journal Nature by scientists from Oregon State University, Stanford University and Brandeis University. The research was done with the gene "fruitless," which is present...

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2005-06-15 18:37:21

Turning on a single male-specific gene produces a female fruit fly that displays male courtship behaviors: chasing other females, tapping their abdomens and performing wing-beating love serenades. The results, published in the June 15 online edition of the journal Nature, show that a single gene can determine how females and males detect and respond differently to sexual cues. ''In these experiments we see all the steps of the male courtship ritual you could physically expect a female fly to...

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2005-02-19 10:01:59

The evolutionary mystery of how a leopard got its spots illustrates the challenges of tracing changes in form and pattern. A new model system in fruitflies shows how colorful decoration may enhance reproductive chances for success. It turns out that mutations may stick around if they don't get the organism killed first. Astrobiology Magazine -- Like the gaudy peacock or majestic buck, the bachelor fruit fly is in a race against time to mate and pass along its genes. And just as flashy plumage...