Quantcast

Latest Drosophila melanogaster Stories

2010-09-09 01:08:14

The findings could shed new light on human learning and neurological and psychiatric disorders A team led by a Scripps Research Institute scientist has for the first time identified a new gene that is required for memory formation in Drosophila, the common fruit fly. The gene may have similar functions in humans, shedding light on neurological disorders such as Alzheimer's disease or human learning disabilities. The study was published in the September 9, 2010 edition (Vol. 67, No. 5) of the...

2010-08-19 15:07:52

When kitchens become infiltrated with fruit flies, especially during the dog days of summer, homeowners might wish that the flying pests would just turn to ice. The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster does boast a powerful genetic system making it an ideal organism to test a cool new discovery: how an enzyme regulates body energy levels. Shutting off this molecular thermostat could result in a newfound cold tolerance that has multiple applications, including extending the 24-hour window donated...

3adce00a45419f4656306ccec773239d1
2010-08-09 11:35:00

Researchers genetically engineer glow-in-the-dark sperm in fruit flies, revealing much more about sexual selection A lot has changed about the way scientists study sexual selection and reproduction. Some of it has to do with new tools; some of it has to do with new attitudes. There is a lot more going on than just "sperm meets egg." "It was simply thought of as "this army of sperm competing," so it functioned as a raffle; the more tickets you bought, the more sperm you transferred, the more...

4b227378d74eefc16529e7570605f2a8
2010-07-16 10:32:22

Penn Researchers Reverse Cognitive Decline in Flies With Alzheimer's Gene Mutation Investigators have found that fruit fly (Drosophila melanogaster)  males -- in which the activity of an Alzheimer's disease protein is reduced by 50 percent -- show impairments in learning and memory as they age. What's more, the researchers were able to prevent the age-related deficits by treating the flies with drugs such as lithium, or by genetic manipulations that reduced nerve-cell signaling. The...

11f98c0cac9b2c3354a84904dc5895d9
2010-07-12 10:07:44

What would be the point of holding a soccer world championship if we couldn't distinguish the ball from its background? Simply unthinkable! But then again, wouldn't it be fantastic if your favorite team's striker could see the movements of the ball in slow motion! Unfortunately, this advantage only belongs to flies. The minute brains of these aeronautic acrobats process visual movements in only fractions of a second. Just how the brain of the fly manages to perceive motion with such speed and...

2010-07-02 20:17:29

Since the early days of the 20th century and Thomas Hunt Morgan's famous "Fly Room" at Columbia University, the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster has been at the forefront of biological research. The powerful arsenal of experimental methods developed for this model organism is now being used to tackle one of the great scientific challenges of a new century: understanding the nervous system. Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory's Neurobiology of Drosophila course...

0d2b5b0748c722f903370db8a612b81f1
2010-05-21 08:24:30

Biologists from the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) and Yale University have identified two genes, the leucokinin neuropeptide and the leucokinin receptor, that appear to regulate meal sizes and frequency in fruit flies. Both genes have mammalian counterparts that seem to play a similar role in food intake, indicating that the steps that control meal size and meal frequency are not just behaviorally similar but are controlled by the same genes throughout the animal kingdom. A...

0638e4055503399343722ee9d6b641c61
2010-05-14 07:39:49

Researchers in Portugal and Austria show how food intake is modulated in fruit flies Having a balanced diet is a vital concern to all living organisms, not only humans. Animals choose between different food sources according to their nutritional needs. In a study just published in the journal Current Biology, Carlos Ribeiro, group leader in the Champalimaud Neuroscience Program at the Instituto Gulbenkian de Ciência (Portugal), and Barry Dickson, at the Institute of...

3ab16e5dbc7f50924fca538d0a56285d1
2010-03-22 07:31:28

The brains of males and females, and how they use them, may be far more different than previously thought, at least in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, according to research funded by the Wellcome Trust. In a paper published today in the journal Nature Neuroscience, researchers from the University of Glasgow and the University of Oxford, have shown that the gene known as 'doublesex' (dsx), which determines the shape and structure of the male and female body in the fruit fly, also...

b950b0e8c13b5bccaf0f3592cb8c4f101
2010-03-19 08:22:45

Previously unobservable events occurring between insemination and fertilization are the subject of a groundbreaking new article in Science magazine (March 18) by Mollie Manier, John Belote and Scott Pitnick, professors of biology in Syracuse University's College of Arts and Sciences. By genetically altering fruit flies so that the heads of their sperm were fluorescent green or red, Belote and his colleagues were able to observe in striking detail what happens to live sperm inside the female....


Word of the Day
snash
  • To talk saucily.
  • Insolent, opprobrious language; impertinent abuse.
This word is Scots in origin and probably imitative.