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Latest Drought Stories

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2008-04-02 15:35:00

Biofuel production, renewable energy expansion, other mitigation measures uprooting indigenous peoples in many regionsIndigenous peoples have contributed the least to world greenhouse gas emissions and have the smallest ecological footprints on Earth. Yet they suffer the worst impacts not only of climate change, but also from some of the international mitigation measures being taken, according to organizers of a United Nations University co-hosted meeting April 3 in Darwin, Australia.Impacts...

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2008-02-20 14:40:00

They may be considered pests, but beaver can help mitigate the effects of drought, and because of that, their removal from wetlands to accommodate industrial, urban and agricultural demands should be avoided, according to a new University of Alberta study."Removal of beaver should be considered an environmental disturbance on par with in-filling, peat mining and industrial water extraction," said researcher Glynnis Hood, lead author on the study and an assistant professor of Environmental...

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2008-02-12 15:15:00

Analysis of current and scheduled use and human-induced climate change sparks urgent warning from researchers at Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UC San DiegoThere is a 50 percent chance Lake Mead, a key source of water for millions of people in the southwestern United States, will be dry by 2021 if climate changes as expected and future water usage is not curtailed, according to a pair of researchers at Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UC San Diego. Without Lake Mead and neighboring...

2008-02-01 10:35:00

When it rains, it sometimes still pours out West. But it's not enough. Changes in the western U.S. water supply, such as a declining snowpack and rivers running dry in the summer, can mostly be attributed to human-caused climate change, a new study finds. These changes will require a new approach to water management in the West in the future, scientists say. Water supplies for much of the West come from winter snowfall that accumulates in mountainous regions and melts throughout the spring...

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2007-09-21 18:50:00

The extensive forests of South America's Amazon are turning out to be tougher than expected when it comes to withstanding the onslaughts of a changing climate. A team of U.S. and Brazilian scientists using the insightful eyes of two NASA satellites has shown that one of the worst droughts in decades could not stop the undisturbed regions of the Amazon forest from "greening up." The Amazon drought of 2005 reached its peak just as the region's annual dry season was beginning, from July through...

2007-06-05 21:00:16

Drowned 50 years ago for progress and the promise of near limitless water, the town of Old Adaminaby has re-emerged from its sunken grave as drought ravages one of Australia's biggest lakes. The country's battle with climate change and the worst drought in 100 years was stark at Old Adaminaby as World Environment Day dawned yesterday: Looters picked through the relics of a bygone farming town on the parched floor of Lake Eucumbene. On the lake floor are the remains of an old truck,...

2007-05-17 18:08:05

An epic drought during the mid-1100s dwarfs any drought previously documented for a region that includes areas of Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico, Utah and Wyoming. The six-decade-long drought was remarkable for the absence of very wet years.  At the core of the drought was a period of 25 years in which Colorado River flow averaged 15 percent below normal. The new tree-ring-based reconstruction documents the year-by-year natural variability of streamflows in the upper Colorado River basin...

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2007-04-05 13:35:00

WASHINGTON - Changing climate will mean increasing drought in the Southwest - a region where water already is in tight supply - according to a new study. "The bottom line message for the average person and also for the states and federal government is that they'd better start planning for a Southwest region in which the water resources are increasingly stretched," said Richard Seager of Columbia University's Lamont Doherty Earth Observatory. Seager is lead author of the study published online...

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2007-02-13 08:35:00

NASA scientists may have discovered how a warmer climate in the future could increase droughts in certain parts of the world, including the southwest United States. The researchers compared historical records of the climate impact of changes in the sun's output with model projections of how a warmer climate driven by greenhouse gases would change rainfall patterns. They found that a warmer future climate likely will produce droughts in the same areas as those observed in ancient times, but...

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2006-12-14 18:25:00

WASHINGTON -- The nation set a record for wildfires this year and climate experts say 2006 will probably end as the third warmest year on record for the contiguous United States. Drought and hot conditions contributed to the record wildfire season, with more than 9.5 million acres burned through early December, according to the National Interagency Fire Center. The annual climate report, released Thursday by the National Climatic Data Center, says 2006 will most likely be the third warmest...


Latest Drought Reference Libraries

Desertification
2013-04-02 09:46:56

Desertification is a form of land degradation in which a comparatively dry land area becomes more and more arid, normally losing its bodies of water along with its wildlife and vegetation. This is a result of a variety of factors, such as climate change and human activities. Desertification is an important global, ecological, and environmental issue. There is substantial controversy over the proper definition of the term “desertification”. The most broadly accepted of these is that of...

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Word of the Day
caparison
  • A cloth or covering, more or less ornamented, laid over the saddle or furniture of a horse, especially of a sumpter-horse or horse of state.
  • Clothing, especially sumptuous clothing; equipment; outfit.
  • To cover with a caparison, as a horse.
  • To dress sumptuously; adorn with rich dress.
This word ultimately comes from the Medieval Latin 'cappa,' cloak.
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