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Latest Duke University Stories

Distinctive Male Peacock Love Call Allures Females From Afar
2012-12-21 12:05:04

[Watch Video: Male Peacock Demonstrates 'Hoot-Dash Display'] redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online The distinctive sound made by male peacocks just before mating attracts female voyeurs for reasons currently unknown, a Duke University researcher has discovered. The India peafowl's unique pre-copulation ritual, which is also referred to as the "hoot-dash display," involves the male members of the Phasianinae family dashing toward a female companion and squawking...

2012-12-11 01:02:57

A nanomaterial engineered by researchers at Duke can help regulate chloride levels in nerve cells that contribute to chronic pain, epilepsy, and traumatic brain injury. The findings, published online Dec. 10, 2012, in the journal Small, were demonstrated in individual nerve cells as well as in the brains of mice and rats, and may have future applications in intracranial or spinal devices to help treat neural injuries. Carbon nanotubes are a nanomaterial with unique features, including...

Unemployment May Increase Risk Of Heart Attack
2012-11-20 11:16:40

Connie K. Ho for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online Researchers from Duke University recently revealed results from a study that showed that unemployment may increase the risk of having a heart attack. In particular, the scientists studied the impact of losing jobs multiple times, suffering short spurts without work, and long-term unemployment in relation to the risk for acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Researchers looked at 13,451 U.S. adults between the...

Researcher Improving On Invisibility Cloak Concepts
2012-11-12 12:57:49

Michael Harper for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online The idea of an invisibility cloak is an attractive one to the human psyche. The ability to be present when we´re thought to be absent is a juicy prospect. Not only could we finally find out what people say about us behind our backs, but we´d also be able to watch people without being detected, as well as play some of the world´s greatest pranks. Now, in the latest attempt to turn science fiction into science...

2012-10-24 23:48:44

The flame-retardant mixture known as “Firemaster 550” is an endocrine disruptor that causes extreme weight gain, early onset of puberty and cardiovascular health effects in lab animals, according to a new study spearheaded by researchers from North Carolina State University and Duke University. Firemaster 550 is made up of four principal component chemicals and is used in polyurethane foam in a wide variety of products, ranging from mattresses to infant nursing pillows. The...

2012-10-24 12:05:33

For the first time, scientists have observed how droplets within solids deform and burst under high electric voltages. This is important, the Duke University engineers who made the observations said, because it explains a major reason why such materials as insulation for electrical power lines eventually fail and cause blackouts. This observation not only helps scientists develop better insulation materials, but could also lead to such positive developments as "tunable" lenses for eyes....

Lady Gaga Has Nineteen Species Of Fern Named For Her
2012-10-23 11:58:35

Researcher says the inspiration was literally written in the DNA sequences Pop music megastar Lady Gaga is being honored with the name of a new genus of ferns found in Central and South America, Mexico, Arizona and Texas. A genus is a group of closely related species; in this case, 19 species of ferns will carry the name Gaga. At one stage of its life, the new genus Gaga has somewhat fluid definitions of gender and bears a striking resemblance to one of Gaga's famous costumes. Members...


Word of the Day
toccata
  • In music, a work for a keyboard-instrument, like the pianoforte or organ, originally intended to utilize and display varieties of touch: but the term has been extended so as to include many irregular works, similar to the prelude, the fantasia, and the improvisation.
This word is Italian in origin, coming from the feminine past participle of 'toccare,' to touch.
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