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Latest Duke University Stories

2010-05-28 08:18:08

Political and social chaos and a lack of international protections have put several species of rosewood trees in Madagascar in danger of becoming extinct from illegal logging, according to a policy forum paper in the latest issue of Science. "Forty-seven of Madagascar's 48 species of rosewood (Dalbergia) are found nowhere else in the world," said Duke University graduate student Meredith Barrett, the lead author on the May 27 article. Madagascar's military-backed change in leadership last...

2010-05-26 09:00:00

MENLO PARK, Calif. and KANNAPOLIS, N.C., May 26 /PRNewswire/ -- The Immune Tolerance Institute, Inc. (ITI) and the David H. Murdock Research Institute (DHMRI) today announced a collaboration to establish the Center for Critical Path Research in Immunology (CCPRI) at The David H. Murdock Research Institute on the North Carolina Research Campus in Kannapolis, NC. Driven by a mission to accelerate the discovery and development of new breakthrough treatments for the millions of people...

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2010-05-14 11:16:29

By using medications packaged just like fast-food ketchup, HIV-positive mothers in developing countries can more easily provide protection to newborn babies born at home. Biomedical engineers at Duke University have developed an inexpensive and easy-to-use system that allows mothers to give their newborns a potentially life-saving dose of an anti-HIV medication shortly after birth. This is especially important since such drugs can only be found in clinics or hospitals, which can be days away...

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2010-05-13 09:05:00

Duke University assistant professor Brian Hare and colleagues study the behavior of bonobos -- apes that are genetically close to humans Primatologist Brian Hare wishes more people could discover what bonobos can teach us about human nature. "I really think they are the smartest ape in the world," he said. "We have a lot to learn from them." Bonobos are genetically close to humans, yet most people know very little about them. Through his ongoing research, Hare hopes to change that....

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2010-05-11 14:21:46

In a single day, a solitary grad student at a lab bench can produce more simple logic circuits than the world's entire output of silicon chips in a month. So says a Duke University engineer, who believes that the next generation of these logic circuits at the heart of computers will be produced inexpensively in almost limitless quantities. The secret is that instead of silicon chips serving as the platform for electric circuits, computer engineers will take advantage of the unique properties...

2010-04-30 13:35:00

Children normally experience flights of fancy, including imaginary friends and conversations with stuffed animals, but some of them are also having hallucinations and delusions which might be the early signs of psychosis. A study of British 12-year-olds that asked whether they had ever seen things or heard voices that weren't really there, and then asked careful follow-up questions, has found that nearly 6 percent may be showing at least one definite symptom of psychosis. The children who...

2010-04-22 11:35:11

DURHAM, N.C. -- A group of scientists who have studied the life history of primates for decades got to thinking about their own life histories and decided they had better do something to preserve their work for posterity. The conversation started after University of Wisconsin-Madison anthropologist Karen Strier experienced the unexpected deaths of two friends and academic colleagues "“ one a UW-Madison professor, the other a Brazilian graduate student. She approached Susan Alberts, a...

2010-04-21 06:29:05

As airport security employees scan luggage for a large variety of banned items, they may miss a deadly box cutter if they find a water bottle first. According to new research at Duke University, identifying an easy-to-spot prohibited item such as a water bottle may hinder the discovery of other, harder-to-spot items in the same scan. Missing items in a complex visual search is not a new idea: in the medical field, it has been known since the 1960s that radiologists tend to miss a second...

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2010-04-19 15:29:18

New delivery platform may become a therapy for patients with vascular disease Scientists and engineers have used uniform magnetic fields to drive iron-bearing nanoparticles to metal stents in injured blood vessels, where the particles deliver a drug payload that successfully prevents blockages in those vessels. In this animal study, the novel technique achieved better results at a lower dose than conventional non-magnetic stent therapy. Conducted in cell cultures and rats, the research is the...

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2010-04-12 13:34:06

Energy-efficiency measures in the southern U.S. could save consumers $41 billion on their energy bills, open 380,000 new jobs, and save 8.6 billion gallons of water by 2020, according to a new study from the Nicholas Institute for Environmental Policy Solutions at Duke University and the Georgia Institute of Technology. The study concludes that investing $200 billion in energy efficiency programs by 2030 could return $448 billion in savings. The researchers modeled how implementation of nine...


Word of the Day
negawatt
  • A unit of saved energy.
Coined by Amory Lovins, chairman of the Rocky Mountain Institute as a contraction of negative watt on the model of similar compounds like megawatt.