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Latest Duke University Stories

2013-07-09 11:43:45

Max Scherzer leads Major League Baseball in wins. As a pitcher for the Detroit Tigers, he hasn't lost a game this season. His 6-foot, 3-inch frame is a telling example of constructal-law theory, said Duke University engineer Adrian Bejan. The theory predicts that elite pitchers will continue to be taller and thus throw faster and seems also to apply to athletes who compete in golf, hockey and boxing. Studying athletes -- since most sports are meticulous in keeping statistics -- provides...

2013-07-03 14:58:25

You might be falling in love with that new car, but you probably wouldn't pay as much for it if you could resist the feeling. Researchers at Duke University who study how the brain values things -- a field called neuroeconomics -- have found that your feelings about something and the value you put on it are calculated similarly in a specific area of the brain. The region is small area right between the eyes at the front of the brain. It's called the ventromedial prefrontal cortex, or...

Military Sonar Disrupts Behavior Of Blue Whales
2013-07-03 14:31:38

Michael Harper for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online A new study has found whales do not care for the sound of the sonar used by militaries to detect submarines. Researchers from Duke University in Durham, North Carolina, have observed the behavior of whales as they come into areas where sonar is being used and found these marine mammals may even avoid venturing into new feeding areas when they hear sonar. The results of this research suggest militaries should refrain from...

2013-06-28 13:14:00

Children with more genetic risks for asthma are not only more likely to develop the condition at a young age, but they are also more likely to continue to suffer with asthma into adulthood. The finding reported by Duke University researchers is one of the latest to come from a 40-year longitudinal study of New Zealanders. "We've been able to look at how newly discovered genetic risks relate to the life course of asthma at an unprecedented level of resolution," said Daniel Belsky, a...

Carbon Nanotube Harpoon Used to Catch Individual Brain-cell Signals
2013-06-20 11:33:48

Duke University Neuroscientists may soon be modern-day harpooners, snaring individual brain-cell signals instead of whales with tiny spears made of carbon nanotubes. The new brain cell spear is a millimeter long, only a few nanometers wide and harnesses the superior electromechanical properties of carbon nanotubes to capture electrical signals from individual neurons. "To our knowledge, this is the first time scientists have used carbon nanotubes to record signals from individual...

Eating And Exercise Habits Influenced By Mothers
2013-06-19 05:31:37

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Mothers who practice what they preach when it comes to being active and making healthy food choices are more likely to have children who exercise and eat well, according to research published online Tuesday by the International Journal of Obesity. In the study, Truls Østbye, a professor of community and family medicine at Duke University, and his colleagues report that their findings should serve as a reminder to both...

2013-06-12 23:18:50

Today DataChambers announces that it plans to expand into the Charlotte market with a new data center to be built on the research campus–providing businesses across the region with hosted and cloud-based infrastructure solutions, network management, data backup and business continuity solutions. Kannapolis, N.C. (PRWEB) June 12, 2013 DataChambers, a North State Communications company that specializes in information technology services, is joining the North Carolina Research...

Gamers Have Better Visual And Decision Making Skills
2013-06-12 09:34:54

Michael Harper for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online Just as exercise and lifting weights can be used to boost the body´s strength, playing video games can train the brain to make better and faster decisions based on visual input. Researchers from Duke University are making this claim after conducting a study on the way the brain handles visual responses and both remembers and responds to visual scenes. Gamers and non-gamers were pit against one another to complete this...

Bioengineered Blood Vessels Successfully Implanted In Patient
2013-06-07 04:50:47

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Surgeons at Duke University have announced the successful implantation of a bioengineered blood vessel in the United States. “This is a pioneering event in medicine,” said Dr. Jeffrey H. Lawson, a vascular surgeon and vascular biologist at Duke Medicine who helped develop the technology. “It´s exciting to see something you´ve worked on for so long become a reality.” “We talk about...

Pollution Controls Increase Attendance On Beaches
2013-06-06 11:53:23

Duke University Southern California beaches with storm drain diversion systems attract millions more people annually, a new study in the journal Marine Pollution Bulletin shows. The study looked at whether improving the environmental quality of coastal areas through policy intervention had an effect on the way people use coastal areas. Researchers found a direct correlation between increased attendance and the installation of storm drain diversions at 26 beaches in Santa Monica Bay and...


Word of the Day
sough
  • A murmuring sound; a rushing or whistling sound, like that of the wind; a deep sigh.
  • A gentle breeze; a waft; a breath.
  • Any rumor that engages general attention.
  • A cant or whining mode of speaking, especially in preaching or praying; the chant or recitative characteristic of the old Presbyterians in Scotland.
  • To make a rushing, whistling, or sighing sound; emit a hollow murmur; murmur or sigh like the wind.
  • To breathe in or as in sleep.
  • To utter in a whining or monotonous tone.
According to the OED, from the 16th century, this word is 'almost exclusively Scots and northern dialect until adopted in general literary use in the 19th.'
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