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Latest Dynein Stories

2012-11-09 11:08:49

Biologists have identified a new molecular player in asymmetric cell division, a protein named She1 whose role wasn't known before - This is important for self-renewal of stem cells and ensures that daughter cells have different fates and functions Recently biologists at the University of Massachusetts Amherst led by Wei-lih Lee have identified a new molecular player in asymmetric cell division, a regulatory protein named She1 whose role in chromosome- and spindle positioning wasn't known...

2012-02-13 13:16:03

To solve a mystery, sometimes a great detective need only study the clues in front of him. Like Agatha Christie's Hercule Poirot and Arthur Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes, Tomomi Kiyomitsu used his keen powers of observation to solve a puzzle that had mystified researchers for years: in a cell undergoing mitotic cell division, what internal signals cause its chromosomes to align on a center axis? "People have been looking at these proteins and players in mitosis for decades, and no one ever...

2012-01-16 10:29:05

Just like people, some proteins have characteristic ways of "walking," which (also like human gaits) are not so easy to describe. But now scientists have discovered the unique "drunken sailor" gait of dynein, a protein that is critical for the function of every cell in the body and whose malfunction has been associated with neurodegenerative disorders such as Lou Gehrig's disease and Parkinson's disease. The research, which was led by Samara Reck-Peterson of Harvard Medical School and...

2011-04-26 14:57:43

A motor regulatory protein can block human ovarian tumor growth, leading to eventual cancer cell death and possible new therapies to treat the disease, according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers. Among U.S. women, an estimated 21,880 new cases and 13,850 deaths occurred in 2010 from epithelial ovarian cancer, one of the most common forms of ovarian cancer and the most lethal gynecologic cancer in women. Previously, Kathleen M. Mulder, Ph.D., professor, biochemistry and molecular...

2011-02-17 21:07:19

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have identified the motors that move non-infectious prion proteins (PrPC) "“ found within many mammalian cells "“ up and down long, neuronal transport pathways. Identifying normal movement mechanisms of PrPC may help researchers understand the spread of infectious prions within and between neurons to reach the brain, and aid in development of therapies to halt the transport. Their study is published in the...

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2010-04-16 08:53:21

Findings shed light on brain malformation that kills infants A University of Utah researcher helped discover how a "wimpy" protein motor works with two other proteins to gain the strength necessary to move nerve cells and components inside them. The findings shed light on brain development and provide clues to a rare brain disorder that often kills babies within months of birth. "It's like the 'Transformers' films: You start with this puny little car and it becomes a big robot capable of...

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2010-04-05 09:40:27

The neurodegenerative disease spinocerebellar ataxia type 5 (SCA5) damages nerve cells in two ways. University of Minnesota researchers now report that the defective protein responsible for the disease cuts the number of synaptic terminals and snarls traffic inside neurons. The study appears in the April 5 issue of the Journal of Cell Biology. SCA5 results from a faulty gene for {beta}-III"“spectrin. The disease targets the cerebellum's Purkinje cells, which control coordination....

2009-12-02 18:39:59

A new study reveals how molecular motors that power important subcellular movements can generate cyclical motion. The research, published by Cell Press in the December issue of the Biophysical Journal, opens a new door to understanding motor molecules by using a computer program that faithfully simulates movement of hair-like cellular projections. Many cells and single-celled organisms have tiny appendages called cilia and flagella that can wave or oscillate to move fluid across the cell...

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2009-02-09 07:23:24

The last step of the cell cycle is the brief but spectacularly dynamic and complicated mitosis phase, which leads to the duplication of one mother cell into two daughter cells. In mitosis, the chromosomes condense and the nucleus breaks down. Fibrous structures called spindles form, which then move the chromosomal material toward opposite ends of a cell and help partition other cell contents. If something goes wrong, diseases such as cancer can arise. Scientists have tried for years to...

2009-02-05 14:50:30

An international team of scientists led by the University of Leeds has shed new light on the little-understood motor protein called dynein, thought to be involved in progressive neurological disorders such as motor neurone disease. Researchers from the University's Astbury Centre for Structural Molecular Biology and from the University of Tokyo have for the first time identified key elements of dynein's structure, and the winch-like mechanism by which it moves. The research "“ funded by...


Word of the Day
negawatt
  • A unit of saved energy.
Coined by Amory Lovins, chairman of the Rocky Mountain Institute as a contraction of negative watt on the model of similar compounds like megawatt.