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Latest Earth's atmosphere Stories

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2005-11-04 06:20:00

Earth, Mars and Venus all have greenhouse effects. So does Saturn's giant moon Titan. But unlike any other world in our solar system, Titan also has an anti-greenhouse effect. Recently, Chris McKay, a planetary research scientist at NASA Ames Research Center, gave a public lecture, sponsored by the Planetary Society, in which he talked about the scientific results of the Cassini-Huygens mission to Saturn and Titan. In this, the third in a four-part series, McKay explains why Titan's...

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2005-09-30 17:10:00

DURHAM, N.C. -- At least 10 to 30 percent of global warming measured during the past two decades may be due to increased solar output rather than factors such as increased heat-absorbing carbon dioxide gas released by various human activities, two Duke University physicists report. The physicists said that their findings indicate that climate models of global warming need to be corrected for the effects of changes in solar activity. However, they emphasized that their findings do not argue...

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2005-09-27 16:38:18

WASHINGTON -- The effect of greenhouse gases on the Earth's atmosphere has increased 20 percent since 1990, a new government index says. The Annual Greenhouse Gas Index was released Tuesday by the Climate Monitoring and Diagnostics Laboratory in Boulder, Colo. Greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide accumulate in the atmosphere as a result of industrial and other processes. They can help trap solar heat, somewhat like a greenhouse, resulting in a gradual warming of the Earth's atmosphere....

2005-09-07 18:40:00

Using primitive meteorites called chondrites as their models, earth and planetary scientists at Washington University in St. Louis have performed outgassing calculations and shown that the early Earth's atmosphere was a reducing one, chock full of methane, ammonia, hydrogen and water vapor. In making this discovery Bruce Fegley, Ph.D., Washington University professor of earth and planetary sciences in Arts & Sciences, and Laura Schaefer, laboratory assistant, reinvigorate one of the most...

2005-08-11 22:15:00

LIVERMORE, Calif. "“ For the first time, new climate observations and computer models provide a consistent picture of recent warming of the tropical atmosphere. Over the past decade, scientific evidence from a variety of sources has implicated human-caused increases in greenhouse gases as a major driver of recent climate change. A key argument used to rebut such findings relates to satellite records of temperature change in the troposphere "“ the lowest layer of Earth's...

2005-08-09 18:33:39

A number of hypotheses have been used to explain how free oxygen first accumulated in Earth's atmosphere some 2.4 billion years ago, but a full understanding has proven elusive. Now a new model offers plausible scenarios for how oxygen came to dominate the atmosphere, and why it took at least 300 million years after bacterial photosynthesis started producing oxygen in large quantities. The big reason for the long delay was that processes such as volcanic gas production acted as sinks to...

66f48ee21f93681666c276b1044f2f9e1
2005-08-09 05:31:15

A number of hypotheses have been used to explain how free oxygen first accumulated in Earth's atmosphere some 2.4 billion years ago, but a full understanding has proven elusive. Now a new model offers plausible scenarios for how oxygen came to dominate the atmosphere, and why it took at least 300 million years after bacterial photosynthesis started producing oxygen in large quantities. The big reason for the long delay was that processes such as volcanic gas production acted as sinks to...

7008796bc6e704c714c116a6b9bfac9c1
2005-07-07 14:45:00

CHAMPAIGN, Ill. -- A burst of mesospheric cloud activity over Antarctica in January 2003 was caused by the exhaust plume of the space shuttle Columbia during its final flight, reports a team of scientists who studied satellite and ground-based data from three different experiments. The data also call into question the role these clouds may play in monitoring global climate change. "Our analysis shows that the Columbia's exhaust plume approached the South Pole three days after launch," said...

2005-07-06 14:35:00

(Washington, DC "¢ July 6, 2005) "” A new study, funded in part by the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) reports that exhaust from the space shuttle can create high-altitude clouds over Antarctica mere days following launch, providing valuable insight to global transport processes in the lower thermosphere. The same study also finds that the shuttle's main engine exhaust plume carries small quantities of iron that can be...

2005-07-07 00:05:00

CHAMPAIGN, Ill. -- A burst of mesospheric cloud activity over Antarctica in January 2003 was caused by the exhaust plume of the space shuttle Columbia during its final flight, reports a team of scientists who studied satellite and ground-based data from three different experiments. The data also call into question the role these clouds may play in monitoring global climate change. "Our analysis shows that the Columbia's exhaust plume approached the South Pole three days after launch," said...


Latest Earth's atmosphere Reference Libraries

sts-66
2012-05-12 09:22:57

Atlantis launched from Kennedy Space Center on November 3, 1994 at 11:59 AM EST and landed at Edwards AFB on November 14 at 7:33 AM PST. The shuttle orbited 174 times at an altitude of 164 nautical miles at an inclination of 57 degrees and travelled 4.5 million miles. The mission lasted 10 days, 22 hours, 34 minutes, and 2 seconds. This mission further advanced efforts to collect data about sun's energy output, chemical makeup of the Earth's middle atmosphere, and how these factors affect...

Weather Reference Library
2012-05-08 20:51:43

Important things to know when it comes to weather are the terms that a meteorologist uses on the television, radio or on a weather website.  The first term is Return flow. Sometimes you will hear a meteorologist use this term. The best way to understand this is to look at a weather map. When you see a High pressure center which is the blue H, look to the western side of that high pressure. This is where the warm moist air starts moving from the south back towards the north, which is why it...

22_1663f68fda000d8f11d5a4317e325607
2009-07-06 17:01:44

Arctic haze is a phenomenon that occurs in the atmosphere at high latitudes in the Arctic due to air pollution. What distinguishes Arctic haze from haze found elsewhere, is the ability of its chemical ingredients to endure in the atmosphere for a longer period of time compared to other pollutants. Due to limited snowfall, rain, or turbulent air to displace pollutants from the polar air in the spring, Arctic haze can continue for more than a month in the northern atmosphere. Arctic haze was...

Earth's Atmosphere
2004-10-19 04:45:44

Earth's Atmosphere -- Earth's atmosphere consists of nitrogen (78.1%) and oxygen (20.9%), with small amounts of argon (0.9%), carbon dioxide (variable, but around 0.035%), water vapor, and other gases. The atmosphere protects life on Earth by absorbing ultraviolet solar radiation and reducing temperature extremes between day and night. 75% of the atmosphere exists within 11km of the planetary surface. Temperature and the Atmospheric Layers The temperature of the Earth's atmosphere...

Sky
2004-10-19 04:45:44

Sky -- Although almost everyone have seen it, sky is hard to be defined precisely. Generally, sky is the space seen when one looks upward from the surface of a planet. Some people define sky as the denser gaseous zone of a planet's atmosphere. Clouds, rainbows and weather all occur amongst a planet's sky. In astronomy, the sky is divided into many regions, called constellations. The blue colour of the daytime sky results from the selective scattering of light rays. When the sunlight...

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Word of the Day
vermicular
  • Like a worm in form or movement; vermiform; tortuous or sinuous; also, writhing or wriggling.
  • Like the track or trace of a worm; appearing as if worm-eaten; vermiculate.
  • Marked with fine, close-set, wavy or tortuous lines of color; vermiculated.
  • A form of rusticated masonry which is so wrought as to appear thickly indented with worm-tracks.
This word ultimately comes from the Latin 'vermis,' worm.
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