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2011-03-17 07:58:50

The mineral quartz may play a key role in the formation of earthquake faults, mountains, and valleys, according to a new study published Thursday in the journal Nature. The research, which was led by Utah State University geophysicist Anthony Lowry and Marta Perez-Gussinye of the University of London, discovered that when high concentrations of this common mineral were found near the Earth's surface, they could create weak spots in the crust which, according to Sid Perkins of Science Now,...

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2010-10-06 08:34:41

COCONet will transform understanding of earthquakes, hurricanes in vulnerable region How can we better understand and assess seismic and other natural hazards in the Caribbean and Central America? What are the slip rates along active faults that bound the Caribbean tectonic plate? How is stress released at these plate boundaries? How sensitive is tropospheric water vapor content to changes in sea surface temperatures? How does the distribution of water vapor across the Caribbean region...

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2010-08-26 07:57:40

New seismic technique detects boundary between old and new lithosphere The North American continent is not one thick, rigid slab, but a layer cake of ancient, 3 billion-year-old rock on top of much newer material probably less than 1 billion years old, according to a new study by seismologists at the University of California, Berkeley. The finding, which is reported in the Aug. 26 issue of Nature, explains inconsistencies arising from new seismic techniques being used to explore the interior...

2010-06-25 14:44:31

California's San Andreas fault is notorious for repeatedly generating major earthquakes and for being on the brink of producing the next "big one" in a heavily populated area. But the famously violent fault also has quieter sections, where rocks easily slide against each other without giving rise to damaging quakes. The relatively smooth movement, called creep, happens because the fault creates its own lubricants---slippery clays that form ultra-thin coatings on rock fragments, geologist Ben...

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2009-12-12 12:51:59

Water in Earth's critical zone; declining water resources in the U.S. west; "zebra stripes" in rock; dark energy under the sea-floor; undersea volcanic eruptions; Sumatra earthquake zone among topics Society stands at a crossroads. With growing problems such as resource depletion, energy sustainability, environmental degradation and climate change, can we protect the health of the planet while achieving widespread economic prosperity? This and other questions will be addressed at the fall...

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2009-11-21 09:30:00

A research team led by the University of Colorado at Boulder has found a clever way to use traditional GPS satellite signals to measure snow depth as well as soil and vegetation moisture, a technique expected to benefit meteorologists, water resource managers, climate modelers and farmers. The researchers have developed a technique that uses interference patterns created when GPS signals that reflect off of the ground -- called "multipath" signals -- are combined with signals that arrive at...

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2009-05-26 15:30:00

There are very few places in the world where dynamic activity taking place beneath Earth's surface goes undetected. Volcanoes, earthquakes, and even the sudden uplifting or sinking of the ground are all visible results of restlessness far below, but according to research by Arizona State University (ASU) seismologists, dynamic activity deep beneath us isn't always expressed on the surface. The Great Basin in the western United States is a desert region largely devoid of major surface changes....

2008-08-27 15:00:54

By Lisa Krieger MediaNews staff How do you measure a restless landscape? It takes an earthquake for humans to feel the shift of geological plates beneath our feet. But a new network of hypersensitive tools installed around the Bay Area detects even the most subtle shrugs, providing important insights about the slow stretching, splitting and drifting of our region. Part of the National Science Foundation-funded EarthScope, the most ambitious earth science project ever attempted, the...

2008-08-19 03:00:31

SAN JOSE, Calif. - How do you measure a restless landscape? It takes an earthquake for humans to feel the shift of geological plates beneath our feet. But a new network of hypersensitive tools installed around the Bay Area detects even the most subtle shrugs, providing important insights about the slow stretching, splitting and drifting of the region. Part of the National Science Foundation-funded EarthScope, the most ambitious earth science project ever attempted, the Plate Boundary...

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2008-07-10 06:25:00

Scientists say they have discovered the ability to predict an earthquake hours before it strikes simply by studying changes in rocks. The study, published in the journal Nature on Thursday, said the observations used sensors that were lowered into holes previously drilled in an earthquake zone. U.S. researchers found stress-induced changes in rocks hours before two small sized tremors ran through the San Andreas Fault in California. Paul Silver of the Carnegie Institution for Science...


Word of the Day
barratry
  • The offense of persistently instigating lawsuits, typically groundless ones.
  • An unlawful breach of duty on the part of a ship's master or crew resulting in injury to the ship's owner.
  • Sale or purchase of positions in church or state.
This word ultimately comes from the Old French word 'barater,' to cheat.
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