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Rivers, Streams Release Far More Carbon Dioxide Than Do Lakes: Study
2013-12-10 06:51:50

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Contrary to common belief, rivers and streams release carbon dioxide (CO2) into the atmosphere at a rate five times greater than the world's lakes and reservoirs combined. The findings of this international study, which included the University of Waterloo, have been published in the journal Nature. "Identifying the sources and amounts of carbon dioxide released from continental water sources has been a gap in understanding the carbon...

Mesquite Trees Displacing Southwestern Grasslands
2012-03-19 04:15:21

As the desert Southwest becomes hotter and drier, semi-arid grasslands are slowly being replaced by a landscape dominated by mesquite trees, such as Prosopis velutina, and other woody shrubs, a team of University of Arizona researchers has found. In a "leaf-to-landscape" approach, the team combined physiological experiments on individual plants and measurements across entire ecosystems to quantify how well grasslands, compared to mesquite trees and woody shrubs, cope with heat and water...

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2010-02-08 12:30:00

With Valentine's Day just around the corner, the UK is gearing itself up to import tens of thousands of roses to send to loved ones as a symbol of affection. However, across the world, Kenya sees an increasingly devastated ecosystem as this tradition continues. If you are lucky enough to receive a rose, you are usually more concerned with who it is from, not where it is from, and that is the problem Dr David Harper, Senior Lecturer from the University of Leicester's Department of Biology, has...


Word of the Day
siliqua
  • A Roman unit of weight, 1⁄1728 of a pound.
  • A weight of four grains used in weighing gold and precious stones; a carat.
  • In anatomy, a formation suggesting a husk or pod.
  • The lowest unit in the Roman coinage, the twenty-fourth part of a solidus.
  • A coin of base silver of the Gothic and Lombard kings of Italy.
'Siliqua' comes from a Latin word meaning 'a pod.'
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