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Latest Ecology Stories

2014-10-16 23:00:52

Franchise Corporation brings innovative mosquito and tick control solution to Kentucky green industry trade show. North Attleboro, MA (PRWEB) October 16, 2014 Mosquito Shield Franchise Corporation will introduce its innovative mosquito and tick control franchise opportunity to industry professionals at the GIE+Expo in Louisville, KY. The event takes place from Oct. 22 through Oct. 24 at the Kentucky Exposition Center. The Green Industry & Equipment Expo is one of the largest in the...

2014-10-14 08:23:14

GATINEAU, QC, Oct. 14, 2014 /CNW/ - Parks Canada reported on its seasonal assessment of fire management in national parks. Parks Canada's Fire Management Specialists conducted 12 prescribed fires as part of an on-going program to restore healthy forests, grasslands and wildlife habitat, and to help reduce the risk of wildfire in present-day overly old, dense vegetation. Parks Canada's fire teams also quickly suppressed 84 fires in 16 national parks that had the potential to threaten people...

Corals Find Refuge In Mangrove Habitat
2014-10-10 03:07:35

Provided By USGS Certain types of corals, invertebrates of the sea that have been on Earth for millions of years, appear to have found a way to survive some of their most destructive threats by attaching to and growing under mangrove roots. Scientists with the U.S. Geological Survey and Eckerd College recently published research on a newly discovered refuge for reef-building corals in mangrove habitats of the U.S. Virgin Islands. More than 30 species of reef corals were found growing...

Creepy Crawlers Play An Important Role In Structure Of Grasslands
2014-10-07 03:19:26

Provided by Kevin Dennehy, Yale School Forestry & Environmental Studies When asked to describe a forest or a meadow, most people would probably begin with the plants, the species diversity, or the color of the foliage. They probably wouldn’t pay much attention to the animals living in the soil. But a new Yale-led study shows the critical importance of earthworms, beetles, and other tiny creatures to the structure of grasslands and the valuable ecosystem services they provide....

Darwin Had It Right All Along About Invasive Species
2014-10-06 03:25:14

Brown University Dov Sax of Brown University and Jason Fridley of Syracuse University aren't proposing a novel idea to explain species invasiveness. In fact, Charles Darwin articulated it first. What's new about Sax and Fridley's "Evolutionary Imbalance Hypothesis" (EIH) is that they've tested it using quantifiable evidence and report in Global Ecology and Biogeography that the EIH works well. The EIH idea is this: Species from regions with deep and diverse evolutionary histories are...

Central Park soil
2014-10-02 03:05:28

Noah Fierer, University of Colorado at Boulder Soil microbes that thrive in the deserts, rainforests, prairies and forests of the world can also be found living beneath New York City’s Central Park, according to a surprising new study led by Colorado State University and the University of Colorado Boulder. The research team analyzed 596 soil samples collected from across Central Park’s 843 acres and discovered a stunning diversity of below-ground life, most of which had never been...

African lioness, Masai Mara National Reserve, Kenya
2014-10-01 05:17:57

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online The populations of mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians, and fish around the globe decreased 52 percent from 1970 to 2010, according to the newly-released 2014 Living Planet report from the World Wildlife Fund (WWF). The report also concluded that the quantity of carbon in our atmosphere is fueling climate change which is currently destabilizing ecosystems. High levels of reactive nitrogen are also degrading lands, rivers and oceans,...

Phytoplankton bloom
2014-09-30 03:00:50

Kasha Patel, NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center The greens and blues of the ocean color from NASA satellite data have provided new insights into how climate and ecosystem processes affect the growth cycles of phytoplankton — microscopic aquatic plants important for fish populations and Earth’s carbon cycle. At the bottom of the ocean’s food chain, phytoplankton account for roughly half of the net photosynthesis on Earth. Their photosynthesis consumes carbon dioxide and plays a...

2014-09-22 20:21:02

DAVIS, Calif., Sept. 22, 2014 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- USDA's Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) today announced the winning proposals funded for 2014 California Conservation Innovation Grants (CIG) in the state level competition. Five projects have been awarded more than $324,000 to develop conservation approaches to benefit wildlife and native plants, conserve water, and improve farm resource management. "CIG invests in innovative, on-the-ground conservation...

fall foliage
2014-09-21 06:08:40

Chuck Bednar for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online The fall foliage transformations that so colorfully mark the start of the autumn season could soon start arriving later and lasting longer due to climate change, researchers from Princeton University report in the latest edition of the journal Global Ecology and Biogeography. In the study, senior author David Medvigy, an assistant professor of geosciences and associated faculty member at the Princeton Environmental Institute, and his...


Latest Ecology Reference Libraries

Guadalupe Storm Petrel, Oceanodroma macrodactyla
2014-09-08 09:23:52

The Guadalupe Storm Petrel (Oceanodroma macrodactyla) is a sea bird of small size belonging to the storm petrel family Hydrobatidae. It is apparently extinct. This species was nearly indistinguishable from its relative, Leach’s Storm petrel. Within the field, they couldn’t be told apart except by their circannual rhythm. In the hand, the Guadalupe Storm Petrel could be distinguished by slightly larger size and the paler colored underwing coverts. It bred only on Guadalupe Island off...

Sequoia slender salamander, Batrachoseps kawia
2014-02-06 10:04:58

The Sequoia slender salamander (Batrachoseps kawia) is a member of the Plethodontidae family. The species is native to California, ranging the western Sierra Mountains in California and the Kaweah River in Tulare County, California. The Sequoia slender salamander inhabits deciduous woodlands, mossy green areas and coniferous forests. The Sequoia slender salamander typically reaches lengths between 1.3 to 1.8 inches long from snout to vent.  As its common name implies, its small, slim body...

San Gabriel slender salamander, Batrachoseps gabrieli
2014-02-06 09:49:23

The San Gabriel slender salamander (Batrachoseps gabrieli) is a member of the Plethodontidae family of salamander species. The species is native to California and it is found ranging from the San Gabriel Canyon, in the eastern San Gabriel Mountains to Kimbark and Waterman Canyon in the extreme western San Bernardino Mountains. The San Gabriel slender salamander grows to lengths between 1.5 and 2 inches. As its name implies, its small, slim body gives this salamander an almost wormlike...

Garden slender salamander
2014-01-28 09:52:54

The Garden slender salamander (Batrachoseps major) is a member of the Plethodontidae family. The species is native to southern California and Mexico. The Sequoia slender salamander inhabits coastal sage scrub and woodlands, coniferous forests and rocky slopes. The species may also be found in common suburban gardens. The Garden slender salamander typically reaches lengths between 1.2 to 2.3 inches long from snout to vent. Its tail may measure almost 40% of its entire length. As its common...

Black-bellied Slender Salamander, Batrachoseps nigriventris
2014-01-17 15:33:18

The Black-bellied slender salamander (Batrachoseps nigriventris) is a member of the Plethodontidae family. The species is native to California. The slender salamander often inhabits oak woodlands. The species may also be found in mountains, stream surroundings and grasslands. The Black-bellied slender salamander ranges specifically throughout the mountains and valleys of the coast range from southern Monterey County south to the Santa Ana Mountains, including the Tehachapi, Santa Monica...

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Word of the Day
negawatt
  • A unit of saved energy.
Coined by Amory Lovins, chairman of the Rocky Mountain Institute as a contraction of negative watt on the model of similar compounds like megawatt.