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Latest Ecology Stories

2013-12-11 11:59:25

Important new findings reveal promise and peril of land-use decisions A groundbreaking study by Harvard University's Harvard Forest and the Smithsonian Institution reveals that, if left unchecked, recent trends in the loss of forests to development will undermine significant land conservation gains in Massachusetts, jeopardize water quality, and limit the natural landscape's ability to protect against climate change. The scientists researched and analyzed four plausible scenarios for...

Advantage Held By Home Team
2013-12-10 08:59:08

Michigan State University The home team holds the advantage over visitors – at least in the plant world. However, a mere handful of genetic adaptations could even the playing field. In the current issue of the Proceedings for the National Academy of Sciences, Michigan State University researchers and their collaborators found that plant adaptation to different environments involves tradeoffs in performance. Genetic tradeoffs, in part, explain the rich diversity of species on earth....

Salt Marsh Ecosystems Need Quality Biodiversity, Not Just Quantity
2013-12-07 06:03:23

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Scientists have believed for years that preserving more species, no matter which ones, was a key component to enhancing how well an ecosystem performs. A research team from Duke University and the University of Massachusetts at Boston investigating biodiversity loss in a salt marsh says that this isn't quite right. Their findings, published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, show that it's not just the total...

Fruit Flies Pickier Than You Think
2013-12-05 19:17:53

Cell Press On your kitchen counter, it might seem as though fruit flies will show up for just about any type of fruit you leave around for them. But when given a choice about where to lay their eggs, those flies will go for citrus most of the time, new work shows. The basis for that seemingly complex food preference is surprisingly simple, according to a report in the Cell Press journal Current Biology on December 5. It boils down to a single odorant receptor found on a single class of...

Climate Scientists Clears Name Settles
2013-12-05 09:45:03

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Alaska climate scientist Charles Monnett has settled a lawsuit with the US Department of the Interior over the now famous 'Drowning Polar Bear' controversy. Monnett alleges that the government office was tried to silence him to protect its agenda. Monnet was temporarily suspended in 2011 during an inspector general's inquiry into a polar bear research contract he oversaw while working with what is currently the Bureau of Ocean Energy...

2013-12-03 23:22:20

The Southern Land Brokers believe a new law allowing supplemental feeding areas during hunting season to be good for hunters and land managers. Hayneville, AL (PRWEB) December 03, 2013 Hunting season is upon us, and The Southern Land Brokers have high hopes for this year’s season because of the passage of a new, albeit controversial, law. The ACDNR's 2013-2014 Hunting and Fishing Digest states that new law allows for supplemental deer feeding areas on private lands during season,...

Seahorse Heads Are Perfectly Shaped For Catching Prey
2013-11-26 12:58:31

University of Texas at Austin Seahorses are slow, docile creatures, but their heads are perfectly shaped to sneak up and quickly snatch prey, according to marine scientists from The University of Texas at Austin. "A seahorse is one the slowest swimming fish that we know of, but it's able to capture prey that swim at incredible speeds for their size," said Brad Gemmell, research associate at the University of Texas Marine Science Institute, which is part of the College of Natural...

New Species Arise Faster In Temperate Regions Than In The Tropics
2013-11-23 05:39:01

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Biodiversity tends to be higher in the tropics, and new research appearing in the journal Molecular Ecology has an explanation as to why that region of the world is home to so many different types of plants and animals. As part of their study, North Carolina State University geneticist Carlos Botero and his colleagues reviewed 2,300 species of mammals and 6,700 species of birds from all over the world. They found that, even though...


Latest Ecology Reference Libraries

Sequoia slender salamander, Batrachoseps kawia
2014-02-06 10:04:58

The Sequoia slender salamander (Batrachoseps kawia) is a member of the Plethodontidae family. The species is native to California, ranging the western Sierra Mountains in California and the Kaweah River in Tulare County, California. The Sequoia slender salamander inhabits deciduous woodlands, mossy green areas and coniferous forests. The Sequoia slender salamander typically reaches lengths between 1.3 to 1.8 inches long from snout to vent.  As its common name implies, its small, slim body...

San Gabriel slender salamander, Batrachoseps gabrieli
2014-02-06 09:49:23

The San Gabriel slender salamander (Batrachoseps gabrieli) is a member of the Plethodontidae family of salamander species. The species is native to California and it is found ranging from the San Gabriel Canyon, in the eastern San Gabriel Mountains to Kimbark and Waterman Canyon in the extreme western San Bernardino Mountains. The San Gabriel slender salamander grows to lengths between 1.5 and 2 inches. As its name implies, its small, slim body gives this salamander an almost wormlike...

Garden slender salamander
2014-01-28 09:52:54

The Garden slender salamander (Batrachoseps major) is a member of the Plethodontidae family. The species is native to southern California and Mexico. The Sequoia slender salamander inhabits coastal sage scrub and woodlands, coniferous forests and rocky slopes. The species may also be found in common suburban gardens. The Garden slender salamander typically reaches lengths between 1.2 to 2.3 inches long from snout to vent. Its tail may measure almost 40% of its entire length. As its common...

Black-bellied Slender Salamander, Batrachoseps nigriventris
2014-01-17 15:33:18

The Black-bellied slender salamander (Batrachoseps nigriventris) is a member of the Plethodontidae family. The species is native to California. The slender salamander often inhabits oak woodlands. The species may also be found in mountains, stream surroundings and grasslands. The Black-bellied slender salamander ranges specifically throughout the mountains and valleys of the coast range from southern Monterey County south to the Santa Ana Mountains, including the Tehachapi, Santa Monica...

India Shoebutton Ardisia, Ardisia elliptica
2014-01-17 14:57:17

Ardisia elliptica is an evergreen tree species. The plant is a member of the Myrsinaceae family. It may also be commonly referred to as the Shoebutton ardisia. A. elliptica is a tropical shrub that can grow up to a height of 16 feet. Natural plants growing in forest habitats are recognized by a single stem producing short, perpendicular branches. The leaves are long, leathery and green. Inflorescences or flower clusters are grown in the leaf axils of the branches leaves. Flowers have light...

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Word of the Day
endocarp
  • The hard inner (usually woody) layer of the pericarp of some fruits (as peaches or plums or cherries or olives) that contains the seed.
This word comes from the Greek 'endon,' in, within, plus the Greek 'karpos', fruit.
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