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Latest Ecology Stories

2013-09-18 15:43:41

Saving energy is important for humans and animals alike when resources are limited. Scientists at the Research Institute of Wildlife Ecology of the University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna, found out that although higher-ranked red deer gain privileged access to patches of food, they also have higher metabolic rates and thus use more energy. This can be a serious disadvantage in winter when red deer rely largely on their limited stored body fat to survive. Energy budget adjustments...

Peru Cloud Forests Threatened
2013-09-12 12:13:07

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online According to a new study from Wake Forest University published by the journal PLOS ONE, a confluence of climate change and ecological factors could threaten Peru’s cloud forests, which are nestled along the eastern slopes of the Andes Mountains. Home to one third of Peru's mammal, bird and frog species, the cloud forests are renowned for their biodiversity and high elevation. At altitudes between 6,500 and 11,000 feet, they are a...

Ugly Animal Preservation Society Mascot
2013-09-12 10:48:25

[ Watch the Video: Who Wins The Ugliest Animal Award? ] Michael Harper for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online An oddball conservation group called the Ugly Animal Preservation Society has finally decided on a mascot meant to champion their cause — the blobfish. Just as the name implies, the blobfish is a gelatinous blob that resembles a cartoonish and grumpy old man, complete with a large nose and drooping face. The society allowed the general public to pick the world’s ugliest...

Rising Temperatures Could Upset Natural Ocean Cycles
2013-09-09 04:15:09

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Rising water temperatures will have an adverse impact on plankton, serving as the catalyst for a series of events that will upset the balance of essential oceanic chemical cycles, according to new research published in Sunday’s edition of the journal Nature Climate Change. Scientists from the University of East Anglia (UEA) in the UK examined the impact that ocean temperatures can have on the plankton ecosystems found in the...

Protecting Key Regions May Help Preserve Plant Species Worldwide
2013-09-06 05:21:32

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Focusing conservation efforts on key regions that comprise less than one-fifth of the Earth’s land could help protect and preserve over two-thirds of the world’s plant species, according to new research appearing in the latest edition of the journal Science. Researchers from Duke University, along with an international team of colleagues, used computer algorithms to identify the smallest set of regions globally that could...

Researchers Identify Unprotected Regions That Harbor The Majority Of Life On Earth
2013-09-05 16:23:48

American Association for the Advancement of Science Can the separate international commitments of protecting 17% of the planet's terrestrial surface and of conserving 60% of the world's plant species within these protected areas be met simultaneously by 2020? A new study suggests that they can—but only if researchers and conservationists do more to safeguard particularly hot spots of biodiversity. According to Lucas Joppa from Microsoft Research in Cambridge, England, and colleagues...

2013-09-04 08:03:26

Big global questions face us, among them: How will we feed a growing global population without ruining the soil and polluting freshwater?  Or meet our burgeoning energy demands while curbing the greenhouse gas emissions that fuel rising sea levels, flooding, drought, disease and wildfire? And what can we do to stem the extinction of thousands of other species that share the planet with us? These daunting “environmental” problems are not only in the domain of ecologists and...

Speciation Theory Questioned
2013-09-03 14:24:14

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online While scientists have catalogued millions and millions of species, there is still no agreement on how exactly new species form. However, a new study published this week in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences could deal a major blow to one prevailing theory - namely, that new species arise when a barrier prevents reproduction between populations. Species-creating barriers could be physical, such as a mountain range, or they...


Latest Ecology Reference Libraries

Sequoia slender salamander, Batrachoseps kawia
2014-02-06 10:04:58

The Sequoia slender salamander (Batrachoseps kawia) is a member of the Plethodontidae family. The species is native to California, ranging the western Sierra Mountains in California and the Kaweah River in Tulare County, California. The Sequoia slender salamander inhabits deciduous woodlands, mossy green areas and coniferous forests. The Sequoia slender salamander typically reaches lengths between 1.3 to 1.8 inches long from snout to vent.  As its common name implies, its small, slim body...

San Gabriel slender salamander, Batrachoseps gabrieli
2014-02-06 09:49:23

The San Gabriel slender salamander (Batrachoseps gabrieli) is a member of the Plethodontidae family of salamander species. The species is native to California and it is found ranging from the San Gabriel Canyon, in the eastern San Gabriel Mountains to Kimbark and Waterman Canyon in the extreme western San Bernardino Mountains. The San Gabriel slender salamander grows to lengths between 1.5 and 2 inches. As its name implies, its small, slim body gives this salamander an almost wormlike...

Garden slender salamander
2014-01-28 09:52:54

The Garden slender salamander (Batrachoseps major) is a member of the Plethodontidae family. The species is native to southern California and Mexico. The Sequoia slender salamander inhabits coastal sage scrub and woodlands, coniferous forests and rocky slopes. The species may also be found in common suburban gardens. The Garden slender salamander typically reaches lengths between 1.2 to 2.3 inches long from snout to vent. Its tail may measure almost 40% of its entire length. As its common...

Black-bellied Slender Salamander, Batrachoseps nigriventris
2014-01-17 15:33:18

The Black-bellied slender salamander (Batrachoseps nigriventris) is a member of the Plethodontidae family. The species is native to California. The slender salamander often inhabits oak woodlands. The species may also be found in mountains, stream surroundings and grasslands. The Black-bellied slender salamander ranges specifically throughout the mountains and valleys of the coast range from southern Monterey County south to the Santa Ana Mountains, including the Tehachapi, Santa Monica...

India Shoebutton Ardisia, Ardisia elliptica
2014-01-17 14:57:17

Ardisia elliptica is an evergreen tree species. The plant is a member of the Myrsinaceae family. It may also be commonly referred to as the Shoebutton ardisia. A. elliptica is a tropical shrub that can grow up to a height of 16 feet. Natural plants growing in forest habitats are recognized by a single stem producing short, perpendicular branches. The leaves are long, leathery and green. Inflorescences or flower clusters are grown in the leaf axils of the branches leaves. Flowers have light...

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Word of the Day
lunula
  • A small crescent-shaped structure or marking, especially the white area at the base of a fingernail that resembles a half-moon.
This word is a diminutive of the Latin 'luna,' moon.
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