Quantcast

Latest Ecology Stories

Protecting Key Regions May Help Preserve Plant Species Worldwide
2013-09-06 05:21:32

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Focusing conservation efforts on key regions that comprise less than one-fifth of the Earth’s land could help protect and preserve over two-thirds of the world’s plant species, according to new research appearing in the latest edition of the journal Science. Researchers from Duke University, along with an international team of colleagues, used computer algorithms to identify the smallest set of regions globally that could...

Researchers Identify Unprotected Regions That Harbor The Majority Of Life On Earth
2013-09-05 16:23:48

American Association for the Advancement of Science Can the separate international commitments of protecting 17% of the planet's terrestrial surface and of conserving 60% of the world's plant species within these protected areas be met simultaneously by 2020? A new study suggests that they can—but only if researchers and conservationists do more to safeguard particularly hot spots of biodiversity. According to Lucas Joppa from Microsoft Research in Cambridge, England, and colleagues...

2013-09-04 08:03:26

Big global questions face us, among them: How will we feed a growing global population without ruining the soil and polluting freshwater?  Or meet our burgeoning energy demands while curbing the greenhouse gas emissions that fuel rising sea levels, flooding, drought, disease and wildfire? And what can we do to stem the extinction of thousands of other species that share the planet with us? These daunting “environmental” problems are not only in the domain of ecologists and...

Speciation Theory Questioned
2013-09-03 14:24:14

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online While scientists have catalogued millions and millions of species, there is still no agreement on how exactly new species form. However, a new study published this week in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences could deal a major blow to one prevailing theory - namely, that new species arise when a barrier prevents reproduction between populations. Species-creating barriers could be physical, such as a mountain range, or they...

Moss And Microbes Reveal Unprecedented Ecological Change On Warming Antarctic Peninsula
2013-08-29 13:21:21

Cell Press By carefully analyzing a 150-year-old moss bank on the Antarctic Peninsula, researchers reporting in Current Biology, a Cell Press publication, on August 29 describe an unprecedented rate of ecological change since the 1960s driven by warming temperatures. "Whilst moss and amoebae may not be the first organisms that come to mind when considering Antarctica, they are dominant components of the year-round terrestrial ecosystem in the small ice-free zones during an austral...

Wildlife Sanctuary Forced To Euthanize Hundreds Of Tortoises
2013-08-26 13:52:25

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Officials with the Desert Tortoise Conservation Center outside Las Vegas, Nevada say they are about to put down hundreds of tortoises because of a lack of funding. Officials said they plan to close down the 220-acre wildlife reserve in the coming months and euthanize desert tortoises they have been taking care of since 1990, according to a special report by the Associated Press (AP). The refuge will stop taking in new animals in the...

Understanding Marine Life's Ability To Adapt To Climate Change
2013-08-26 06:03:13

University of Plymouth A study into marine life around an underwater volcanic vent in the Mediterranean, might hold the key to understanding how some species will be able to survive in increasingly acidic sea water should anthropogenic climate change continue. Researchers have discovered that some species of polychaete worms are able to modify their metabolic rates to better cope with and thrive in waters high in carbon dioxide (CO2), which is otherwise poisonous to other, often...


Latest Ecology Reference Libraries

Guadalupe Storm Petrel, Oceanodroma macrodactyla
2014-09-08 09:23:52

The Guadalupe Storm Petrel (Oceanodroma macrodactyla) is a sea bird of small size belonging to the storm petrel family Hydrobatidae. It is apparently extinct. This species was nearly indistinguishable from its relative, Leach’s Storm petrel. Within the field, they couldn’t be told apart except by their circannual rhythm. In the hand, the Guadalupe Storm Petrel could be distinguished by slightly larger size and the paler colored underwing coverts. It bred only on Guadalupe Island off...

Sequoia slender salamander, Batrachoseps kawia
2014-02-06 10:04:58

The Sequoia slender salamander (Batrachoseps kawia) is a member of the Plethodontidae family. The species is native to California, ranging the western Sierra Mountains in California and the Kaweah River in Tulare County, California. The Sequoia slender salamander inhabits deciduous woodlands, mossy green areas and coniferous forests. The Sequoia slender salamander typically reaches lengths between 1.3 to 1.8 inches long from snout to vent.  As its common name implies, its small, slim body...

San Gabriel slender salamander, Batrachoseps gabrieli
2014-02-06 09:49:23

The San Gabriel slender salamander (Batrachoseps gabrieli) is a member of the Plethodontidae family of salamander species. The species is native to California and it is found ranging from the San Gabriel Canyon, in the eastern San Gabriel Mountains to Kimbark and Waterman Canyon in the extreme western San Bernardino Mountains. The San Gabriel slender salamander grows to lengths between 1.5 and 2 inches. As its name implies, its small, slim body gives this salamander an almost wormlike...

Garden slender salamander
2014-01-28 09:52:54

The Garden slender salamander (Batrachoseps major) is a member of the Plethodontidae family. The species is native to southern California and Mexico. The Sequoia slender salamander inhabits coastal sage scrub and woodlands, coniferous forests and rocky slopes. The species may also be found in common suburban gardens. The Garden slender salamander typically reaches lengths between 1.2 to 2.3 inches long from snout to vent. Its tail may measure almost 40% of its entire length. As its common...

Black-bellied Slender Salamander, Batrachoseps nigriventris
2014-01-17 15:33:18

The Black-bellied slender salamander (Batrachoseps nigriventris) is a member of the Plethodontidae family. The species is native to California. The slender salamander often inhabits oak woodlands. The species may also be found in mountains, stream surroundings and grasslands. The Black-bellied slender salamander ranges specifically throughout the mountains and valleys of the coast range from southern Monterey County south to the Santa Ana Mountains, including the Tehachapi, Santa Monica...

More Articles (86 articles) »
Word of the Day
abrosia
  • Wasting away as a result of abstinence from food.
The word 'abrosia' comes from a Greek roots meaning 'not' and 'eating'.