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Latest Ecology Stories

Galápagos Hawks Hand Down Lice Like Family Heirlooms
2014-08-11 03:08:49

By Daniel Stolte, University of Arizona Study provides some of the first evidence for the hypothesis of co-divergence between parasites and hosts acting as a major driver of biodiversity Say what you will about the parasitic lifestyle, but in the evolution of life on Earth, it's a winner. Given that about half of all known species are parasites, biologists have long hypothesized that the strategy of leeching off other organisms is a major driver of biodiversity. Studying populations...

2014-08-08 11:04:07

ESA Findings from The Third National Climate Assessment Report (released in spring 2014) will be presented at the Ecological Society of America’s 2014 Annual Meeting in Sacramento, Cal., August 10–15 Two Ignite sessions focusing on findings in the United States National Climate Assesment5 (NCA) will take place on Monday, August 11th during the Ecological Society of America’s 99th Annual Meeting, held this year in Sacramento, California. The first session, Ignite 1: From Plains...

Burrowing Animals May Have Been Key To Stabilizing Earth's Oxygen Reservoir
2014-08-08 03:22:57

University of Southern Denmark Evolution of the first burrowing animals may have played a major role in stabilizing the Earth's oxygen reservoir, according to a new study in Nature Geoscience. Around 540 million years ago, the first burrowing animals evolved. When these worms began to mix up the ocean floor's sediments (a process known as bioturbation), their activity came to significantly influence the ocean's phosphorus cycle and as a result, the amount of oxygen in Earth's...

Pseudophilautus poppiae
2014-08-05 03:30:16

Lauren Ingeno, George Washington University Assistant Professor of Biology Alex Pyron has created the only large-scale biogeographic analysis of its kind. There are more than 7,000 known species of amphibians that can be found in nearly every type of ecosystem on six continents. But there have been few attempts to understand exactly when and how frogs, toads, salamanders and caecilians have moved across the planet throughout time. Armed with DNA sequence data, Alex Pyron, an...

2014-07-30 08:24:44

ALBANY, Ohio, July 30, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- Good Ground LLC. (GGE), a full service ecological services consulting firm, announced plans today to expand their reach to government agencies by applying for a GSA Schedule Contract and actively pursuing federal contracts. Government officials utilize GSA Schedules as a means of procuring goods and services knowing that companies on these schedules have been qualified and thoroughly vetted by the General Services Administration (GSA). "We...

2014-07-29 23:13:24

Conservationist Robyn Barfoot has launched her new blog “Tales of The Tiger” for Global Tiger Day, July 29, 2014, in an effort to help save endangered tigers. Phoenix, AZ (PRWEB) July 29, 2014 Conservationist Robyn Barfoot has launched her new blog “Tales of The Tiger” for Global Tiger Day, in an effort to educate people about the issues facing endangered tigers and how they can help save them. Barfoot, who received her degree from Arizona State University in Wildlife Conservation...

scale insect infestation on a red maple
2014-07-25 02:00:50

Matt Shipman, North Carolina State University New research from North Carolina State University shows that urban "heat islands" are slowly killing red maples in the southeastern United States. One factor is that researchers have found warmer temperatures increase the number of young produced by the gloomy scale insect – a significant tree pest – by 300 percent, which in turn leads to 200 times more adult gloomy scales on urban trees. "We'd been seeing higher numbers of plant-eating...

extinction event
2014-07-25 04:50:18

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online After nearly 3.5 billion years of evolutionary trial and error, the biodiversity of our planet is the highest it has ever been. An international group of scientists warns, however, that it may be reaching a tipping point. The team — consisting of scientists from Stanford University, University of California, Santa Barbara, Universidade Estadual Paulista in Brazil, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, the Natural Environment...

2014-07-22 16:22:46

SCHAUMBURG, Ill., July 22, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- Central Life Sciences, whose founders invented insect growth regulator technology more than 35 years ago, recently announced that Zenivex(®) adulticide has received approval in California from the EPA for mosquito control efforts over cropland and pastureland. "Our California mosquito control customers have been anxiously awaiting this crop clearance for Zenivex(® )adulticide, and we're excited that they can now rely on it for an even...

measuring the diameter of a large tree
2014-07-22 03:30:43

Vanessa Buzzard, University of Arizona Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology The size and age of plants has more of an impact on their productivity than temperature and precipitation, University of Arizona researchers have discovered. UA professor Brian Enquist and postdoctoral researcher Sean Michaletz, along with collaborators Dongliang Cheng from Fujian Normal University in China and Drew Kerkhoff from Kenyon College in Gambier, Ohio, have combined a new mathematical theory...


Latest Ecology Reference Libraries

Guadalupe Storm Petrel, Oceanodroma macrodactyla
2014-09-08 09:23:52

The Guadalupe Storm Petrel (Oceanodroma macrodactyla) is a sea bird of small size belonging to the storm petrel family Hydrobatidae. It is apparently extinct. This species was nearly indistinguishable from its relative, Leach’s Storm petrel. Within the field, they couldn’t be told apart except by their circannual rhythm. In the hand, the Guadalupe Storm Petrel could be distinguished by slightly larger size and the paler colored underwing coverts. It bred only on Guadalupe Island off...

Sequoia slender salamander, Batrachoseps kawia
2014-02-06 10:04:58

The Sequoia slender salamander (Batrachoseps kawia) is a member of the Plethodontidae family. The species is native to California, ranging the western Sierra Mountains in California and the Kaweah River in Tulare County, California. The Sequoia slender salamander inhabits deciduous woodlands, mossy green areas and coniferous forests. The Sequoia slender salamander typically reaches lengths between 1.3 to 1.8 inches long from snout to vent.  As its common name implies, its small, slim body...

San Gabriel slender salamander, Batrachoseps gabrieli
2014-02-06 09:49:23

The San Gabriel slender salamander (Batrachoseps gabrieli) is a member of the Plethodontidae family of salamander species. The species is native to California and it is found ranging from the San Gabriel Canyon, in the eastern San Gabriel Mountains to Kimbark and Waterman Canyon in the extreme western San Bernardino Mountains. The San Gabriel slender salamander grows to lengths between 1.5 and 2 inches. As its name implies, its small, slim body gives this salamander an almost wormlike...

Garden slender salamander
2014-01-28 09:52:54

The Garden slender salamander (Batrachoseps major) is a member of the Plethodontidae family. The species is native to southern California and Mexico. The Sequoia slender salamander inhabits coastal sage scrub and woodlands, coniferous forests and rocky slopes. The species may also be found in common suburban gardens. The Garden slender salamander typically reaches lengths between 1.2 to 2.3 inches long from snout to vent. Its tail may measure almost 40% of its entire length. As its common...

Black-bellied Slender Salamander, Batrachoseps nigriventris
2014-01-17 15:33:18

The Black-bellied slender salamander (Batrachoseps nigriventris) is a member of the Plethodontidae family. The species is native to California. The slender salamander often inhabits oak woodlands. The species may also be found in mountains, stream surroundings and grasslands. The Black-bellied slender salamander ranges specifically throughout the mountains and valleys of the coast range from southern Monterey County south to the Santa Ana Mountains, including the Tehachapi, Santa Monica...

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Word of the Day
grass-comber
  • A landsman who is making his first voyage at sea; a novice who enters naval service from rural life.
According to the OED, a grass-comber is also 'a sailor's term for one who has been a farm-labourer.'