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Latest Ecology Stories

Humans, Not Climate Change, Led To Extinction Of Mammal Giants
2014-06-05 11:08:22

Alan McStravick for redorbit.com - Your Universe online We could be living in a world populated with giant deer, wombats, sabre-toothed cats, marsupial lions and kangaroos but for one important factor: humans killed them all. A new study out of Aarhus University, Denmark's second oldest university, looked back over the past 100,000 years and determined that human expansion and competition, not climate change, marched these and many other large mammals right out of the Animal Kingdom. This...

2014-06-03 23:02:25

New Resource from The Wilderness Society Explores the Past, Present, and Future Values of America’s Wild Legacy Washington (PRWEB) June 03, 2014 In honor of the Wilderness Act, signed into law by President Johnson 50 years ago on September 3rd, a new publication from The Wilderness Society celebrates the role of wilderness in shaping national character, highlights the significance of wilderness to today’s diverse America and calls on Congress to take up its gavel to protect more wild...

2014-06-03 23:00:48

Growing residential mosquito spraying franchise will showcase its turnkey franchise system for potential Southeastern U.S. franchisees. Jacksonville, FL (PRWEB) June 03, 2014 Mosquito Shield Franchise Corporation will introduce its innovative mosquito and tick control franchise opportunity to prospective franchisees at Jacksonville’s two-day Franchise & Business Opportunities Expo to be held at Prime F. Osborn III Convention Center. The regional event, which offers prospective...

Decomposing Logs Show Local Factors Play A Greater Role Than Climate
2014-06-03 15:34:25

By Kevin Dennehy, Yale University A new Yale-led study challenges the long-held assumption that climate is the primary driver of how quickly organic matter decomposes in different regions, a key piece of information used in formulating climate models. In a long-term analysis conducted across several sites in the eastern United States, a team of researchers found that local factors — from levels of fungal colonization to the specific physical locations of the wood — play a far...

endangered okapi
2014-05-31 05:57:42

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Plant and animal species are becoming extinct at rates more than 1,000 times more quickly than they did before the arrival of humans, indicating that the Earth could be edging closer to a sixth great extinction, according to a new study published May 30 in the journal Science. In the study, Duke University biologist Stuart Pimm and his colleagues examined both past and present rates of extinction using the IUCN Red List of...

2014-05-27 23:00:32

Residential mosquito and tick control franchise offering proven results and turnkey operation will present at Charlotte expo. Charlotte, NC (PRWEB) May 27, 2014 Mosquito Shield Franchise Corporation will introduce its innovative mosquito and tick control franchise opportunity to prospective franchisees at the two-day Franchise and Business Opportunities Expo held at the Metrolina Tradeshow Expo in Charlotte, NC. The regional event, which offers prospective entrepreneurs a chance to meet...

2014-05-27 11:56:22

University of Massachusetts at Amherst A new study of how biodiversity arises shows how a mutation in a single gene during development can lead to different consequences not only in jaw shape, but how this leads to different feeding strategies to exploit different ecological niches A new study of how biodiversity arises, by evolutionary biologists at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, shows how a mutation in a single gene during development can lead to different consequences not...

Scientific Collections Of Species Important For Preserving Biodiversity
2014-05-23 11:25:20

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online In an article published in April in the journal Science, researchers from Arizona State University and Plymouth University in the UK argued that the collection of specimens to confirm a species existence has contributed to the extinction of “small and often isolated populations.” On Friday, more than 60 other international research institutions spanning six continents published a response in Science that cited the significant value...

Dryland Ecosystems Emerge As Driver In Global Carbon Cycle
2014-05-22 03:17:36

Montana State University Dryland ecosystems, which include deserts to dry-shrublands, play a more important role in the global carbon cycle than previously thought. In fact, they have emerged as one of its drivers, says Montana State University faculty member Ben Poulter. Surprised by the discovery, Poulter and his collaborators explained their findings in Nature. At the same time, they urged global ecologists to include the emerging role of dryland ecosystems in their research. Nature...

2014-05-21 11:03:07

University of Iowa It's how life survives in a constantly changing environment In Lewis Carroll’s 1871 classic novel Through the Looking Glass, the Red Queen tells Alice: “Now, here, you see, it takes all the running you can do, to keep in the same place.” Over the years, evolutionary biologists have used the Red Queen’s statement to refer to the “Red Queen” hypothesis, which describes how living organisms, including humans, manage to survive in a changing environment by...


Latest Ecology Reference Libraries

Guadalupe Storm Petrel, Oceanodroma macrodactyla
2014-09-08 09:23:52

The Guadalupe Storm Petrel (Oceanodroma macrodactyla) is a sea bird of small size belonging to the storm petrel family Hydrobatidae. It is apparently extinct. This species was nearly indistinguishable from its relative, Leach’s Storm petrel. Within the field, they couldn’t be told apart except by their circannual rhythm. In the hand, the Guadalupe Storm Petrel could be distinguished by slightly larger size and the paler colored underwing coverts. It bred only on Guadalupe Island off...

Sequoia slender salamander, Batrachoseps kawia
2014-02-06 10:04:58

The Sequoia slender salamander (Batrachoseps kawia) is a member of the Plethodontidae family. The species is native to California, ranging the western Sierra Mountains in California and the Kaweah River in Tulare County, California. The Sequoia slender salamander inhabits deciduous woodlands, mossy green areas and coniferous forests. The Sequoia slender salamander typically reaches lengths between 1.3 to 1.8 inches long from snout to vent.  As its common name implies, its small, slim body...

San Gabriel slender salamander, Batrachoseps gabrieli
2014-02-06 09:49:23

The San Gabriel slender salamander (Batrachoseps gabrieli) is a member of the Plethodontidae family of salamander species. The species is native to California and it is found ranging from the San Gabriel Canyon, in the eastern San Gabriel Mountains to Kimbark and Waterman Canyon in the extreme western San Bernardino Mountains. The San Gabriel slender salamander grows to lengths between 1.5 and 2 inches. As its name implies, its small, slim body gives this salamander an almost wormlike...

Garden slender salamander
2014-01-28 09:52:54

The Garden slender salamander (Batrachoseps major) is a member of the Plethodontidae family. The species is native to southern California and Mexico. The Sequoia slender salamander inhabits coastal sage scrub and woodlands, coniferous forests and rocky slopes. The species may also be found in common suburban gardens. The Garden slender salamander typically reaches lengths between 1.2 to 2.3 inches long from snout to vent. Its tail may measure almost 40% of its entire length. As its common...

Black-bellied Slender Salamander, Batrachoseps nigriventris
2014-01-17 15:33:18

The Black-bellied slender salamander (Batrachoseps nigriventris) is a member of the Plethodontidae family. The species is native to California. The slender salamander often inhabits oak woodlands. The species may also be found in mountains, stream surroundings and grasslands. The Black-bellied slender salamander ranges specifically throughout the mountains and valleys of the coast range from southern Monterey County south to the Santa Ana Mountains, including the Tehachapi, Santa Monica...

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Word of the Day
conjunto
  • A style of popular dance music originating along the border between Texas and Mexico, characterized by the use of accordion, drums, and 12-string bass guitar and traditionally based on polka, waltz, and bolero rhythms.
The word 'conjunto' comes through Spanish, from Latin coniūnctus, past participle of coniungere, to join together; see conjoin