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Latest Econometrics Stories

2015-05-22 00:21:12

BEIJING, May 21, 2015 /PRNewswire/ -- The Conference Board Leading Economic Index(®) (LEI) for China increased 1.1 percent in April to 322.2 (2004 = 100), following a 0.5 percent increase

2015-05-19 12:30:49

Four of the Five Cities Saw Significant Default Rate Decreases in April 2015 NEW YORK, May 19, 2015 /PRNewswire/ -- Data through April 2015, released today by S&P Dow Jones Indices

2015-04-21 12:29:49

Bank Card Default Rate Increase Largest in Five Years NEW YORK, April 21, 2015 /PRNewswire/ -- Data through March 2015, released today by S&P Dow Jones Indices and Experian for

2015-03-17 08:28:40

Three of the Five Cities Saw Default Rates Increase in February 2015 NEW YORK, March 17, 2015 /PRNewswire/ -- Data through February 2015, released today by S&P Dow Jones Indices

2015-03-03 00:22:38

Hotel prices paid for U.S.

2015-01-26 08:23:39

DALLAS, Texas, Jan. 26, 2015 /PRNewswire/ -- Swank Capital, LLC and Cushing(®) Asset Management, LP announce an interim change to The Cushing(®) 30 MLP Index (the "Index").

2014-12-16 12:23:24

Three of the Five Cities Saw Default Rates Decrease in November 2014 NEW YORK, Dec.

2014-12-16 08:27:40

Journal of Indexes features Diversification Weighting in Legends of Indexing Issue DENVER, Dec.


Latest Econometrics Reference Libraries

Structural Equation Modeling
2012-05-02 09:54:47

Structural Equation Modeling: A Multidisciplinary Journal is a peer-reviewed scientific journal published by Taylor & Francis. The founder and current editor-in-chief is George Mercoulides (University of California, Riverside). It features methodological and applied papers on structural equation modeling, a blend of multivariate statistical methods from factor analysis to systems of regression equations, with applications across a broad spectrum of social sciences as well as biology....

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Word of the Day
begunk
  • To befool; deceive; balk; jilt.
  • An illusion; a trick; a cheat.
The word 'begunk' may come from a nasalised variant of Scots begeck ("to deceive, disappoint"), equivalent to be- +‎ geck.