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Latest Ecosystem of the North Pacific Subtropical Gyre Stories

North Atlantic Phytoplankton Bloom Triggered By Eddies
2012-07-06 05:16:57

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Scientists studying the annual growth of tiny plants in the North Atlantic Ocean have discovered that this year´s growth spurt began before the sun was able to offer the light needed to fuel the yearly phenomenon. The annual growth spurt of plankton, which is known as the North Atlantic Bloom, takes place each Spring, and results in an immense number of phytoplankton bursting into existence -- first "greening," then...

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2010-08-15 09:51:23

A change in the color of ocean waters could have a drastic effect on the prevalence of hurricanes, new research indicates. In a simulation of such a change in one region of the North Pacific, the study finds that hurricane formation decreases by 70 percent. That would be a big drop for a region that accounts for more than half the world's reported hurricane-force winds. It turns out that the formation of typhoons "” as hurricanes are known in the region "” is heavily mediated by...

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2010-03-15 09:57:40

Australian and US scientists have discovered how changes in winds blowing on the Southern Ocean drive variations in the depth of the surface layer of sea water responsible for regulating exchanges of heat and carbon dioxide between the ocean and the atmosphere. The researchers' findings "“ published on-line today in Nature Geoscience "“ provide new insights into natural processes which have a major influence on the rate of climate change. The surface-mixed layer is a crucial...

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2009-06-23 06:09:48

Biomass, metabolic activity much lower than at previously explored sites An international oceanographic research expedition to the middle of the South Pacific Gyre "“ a site that is as far from continents as it is possible to go on Earth's surface "“ found so few organisms beneath the seafloor that it may be the least inhabited sediment ever explored for evidence of life. Yet since half of the world's ocean is composed of similar gyres, biomass and metabolic activity may be...

2008-05-01 00:40:00

Scientists at the Georgia Institute of Technology have discovered a new climate pattern called the North Pacific Gyre Oscillation. This new pattern explains, for the first time, changes in the water that are important in helping commercial fishermen understand fluctuations in the fish stock. They're also finding that as the temperature of the Earth is warming, large fluctuations in these factors could help climatologists predict how the oceans will respond in a warmer world. The research...

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2005-03-04 07:30:00

NASA -- A few years ago, NASA researcher Watson Gregg published a study showing that tiny free-floating ocean plants called phytoplankton had declined in abundance globally by 6 percent between the 1980s and 1990s. A new study by Gregg and his co-authors suggests that trend may not be continuing, and new patterns are taking place. Why is this important? Well, the tiny ocean plants help regulate our atmosphere and the health of our oceans. Phytoplankton produce half of the oxygen generated by...


Word of the Day
drawcansir
  • A blustering, bullying fellow; a pot-valiant braggart; a bully.
This word is named for Draw-Can-Sir, a character in George Villiers' 17th century play The Rehearsal.
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