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Latest Ecosystem Stories

New System For Early Detection Of Plant Spread In Bodies Of Water
2013-08-01 10:23:09

Technical University Munich As a result of climate change, certain undesirable aquatic plants are starting to invade German water bodies. Even popular recreation areas like Lake Starnberg have been affected, leading to a growing need to monitor the spread of these plants. Up to now, regular monitoring has proven to be a costly process. But in a new approach, researchers at Technische Universitat Munchen (TUM) have developed a quicker and less expensive method. Taking a dip in a...

2013-07-31 10:30:29

Wildlife Conservation Society study finds impending economic growth and climate change impacts require long-term adaptation efforts to conserve Myanmar's unique biodiversity Long isolated by economic and political sanctions, Myanmar returns to the international community amid high expectations and challenges associated with protecting the country's great natural wealth from the impacts of economic growth and climate change. In a new study, scientists from the Wildlife Conservation...

2013-06-26 16:58:42

New research from the University of Guelph, published Tuesday in the journal Biodiversity and Conservation, says that allowing industrial extraction in a northern Ontario old-growth red pine forest – the largest remaining in the world – would significantly threaten biodiversity in Canada. The study says Wolf Lake Forest Reserve is a “scientifically irreplaceable system.” “Wolf Lake Forest deserves intensive study, monitoring and full protection from future development,” said...

Young Students Challenged To Catch Bugs
2013-06-24 07:44:59

ESA Spiders, beetles and worms might look creepy, but these creatures tell us a lot about biodiversity. Students are being challenged to count the creepy-crawlies’ eyes, legs and antennae and compare them with specimens found by astronauts on an underground adventure in September. Secondary-school students can get a taste of finding new life. Young explorers aged 12–14 are being asked to face some of the challenges of the CAVES training course, a mission that sends astronauts...

Effects Of Predators On Carbon Cycle
2013-06-18 09:44:57

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online The predator-prey relationship can affect the flow of carbon through an ecosystem, according to a new study from the Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies. The findings, published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, may offer a new way of looking at biodiversity management and carbon storage for climate change. The study examines the relationship between grasshoppers (herbivores) and spiders (predators)...

2013-06-10 10:38:00

Over the years ecologists have shown how biological diversity benefits the health of small, natural communities. New analysis by ecologists at UC Santa Cruz demonstrates that even higher levels of biological diversity are necessary to maintain ecosystem health in larger landscapes over long periods of time. Think of it as patches on a quilt, says Erika Zavaleta, UCSC associate professor of environmental studies. Each patch may be a diverse habitat of plants, animals, and insects but it is...

Amazon Tree Seeds Become Smaller, Weaker Because Of Bird Decline
2013-05-31 11:39:54

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Over the last century, the disappearance of large, fruit-eating birds from the tropical forests of Brazil has caused the region´s forest palms to produce smaller, less successful seeds, according to an international team of researchers. The findings, published in Science, provide evidence that human activity can trigger fast-paced evolutionary changes in natural populations. Mauro Galetti, biological sciences professor from the...

2013-05-29 09:39:41

A new study, published 28 May in the open access journal PLOS Biology, has revealed the potential importance of rare species in the functioning of highly diverse ecosystems. Using data from three very different ecosystems–coral reefs, tropical forests and alpine meadows–a team of researchers led by David Mouillot at the University of Montpellier 2, France, has shown that it is primarily the rare species, rather than the more common ones, that have distinct traits involved in...

Determining How Nature's Benefits Link To Human Well-being
2013-05-23 12:16:52

Michigan State University What people take from nature — water, food, timber, inspiration, relaxation — are so abundant, it seems self-evident. Until you try to quantitatively understand how and to what extent they contribute to humans. In today's world, where competition for and degradation of natural resources increases globally, it becomes ever more crucial to quantify the value of ecosystem services — the precise term that defines nature's benefits, and even more...


Word of the Day
mundungus
  • A stinking tobacco.
  • Offal; waste animal product; organic matter unfit for consumption.
This word comes from the Spanish 'mondongo,' tripe, entrails.