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Last updated on April 17, 2014 at 13:30 EDT

Latest Ectotherm Stories

Extreme Weather Caused By Climate Change Decides Distribution Of Insects
2014-02-21 09:58:26

Christina Troelsen and Johannes Overgaard, Aarhus University Extreme weather caused by climate change in the coming decades is likely to have profound implications for distributions of insects and other invertebrates. This is suggested by a new study of insects in tropical and temperate regions of Australia. As climate change is progressing, the temperature of our planet increases. This is particularly important for the large group of animals that are cold-blooded (ectothermic),...

2012-12-13 12:21:21

A new study by biologists at Mercyhurst University focuses on the influence of climate change, particularly warmer winters, on the survival and potential fecundity of cold-blooded animals. Cold blooded animals, or ectotherms, do not have an internal mechanism for regulating body temperature. Instead, they rely on solar energy captured by the environment. The purpose of the Mercyhurst study, a collaboration of Michael Elnitsky, Ph.D., assistant professor of biology; and students Drew...

2012-08-17 06:01:17

In the face of a changing climate many species must adapt or perish. Ecologists studying evolutionary responses to climate change forecast that cold-blooded tropical species are not as vulnerable to extinction as previously thought. The study, published in the British Ecological Society's Functional Ecology, considers how fast species can evolve and adapt to compensate for a rise in temperature. The research, carried out at the University of Zurich, was led by Dr Richard Walters, now at...

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2009-06-24 13:51:06

A new study has found that as the climate continues to get warmer, the rate of molecular evolution in mammals could speed up as they attempt to regulate their body temperature. A study of the same species in different climates found that the DNA of those living in warmer conditions were changing at a faster rate, researchers told BBC News. According to the study published in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B, lead author Len Gillman from Auckland University of Technology and colleagues...

2009-04-17 11:34:18

The common research worm, C. elegans, is able to use heat-sensing nerve cells to not only regulate its response to hotter environments, but also to control the pace of its aging as a result of that heat, according to new research at the University of California, San Francisco.The new findings have turned upside down a widespread assumption about how cold-blooded animals respond to and regulate heat, the researchers say. The study is reported in the online early edition of the journal "Current...