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Latest editor-in-chief Stories

2013-04-27 23:02:33

Adults who have been abused or neglected as children have higher rates of heart disease, diabetes, cancer, and are more likely to die at younger ages.


Latest editor-in-chief Reference Libraries

Annual Reports on the Progress of Chemistry Section C
2012-06-04 18:48:40

Annual Reports on the Progress of Chemistry is a series of three journals covering inorganic, bioinorganic, organic, bioorganic and physical chemistry. All three journals are published annually by the Royal Society of Chemistry and are indexed in MEDLINE. ARPC Section A is a compilation of review articles on inorganic and bioinorganic chemistry. The journal’s editor-in-chief is Sarah Ruthven. Every year, the important research achievements of the prominent research scholars are reviewed...

Annual Reports on the Progress of Chemistry Section B
2012-06-04 18:45:30

Annual Reports on the Progress of Chemistry is a series of three journals covering inorganic, bioinorganic, organic, bioorganic and physical chemistry. All three journals are published annually by the Royal Society of Chemistry and are indexed in MEDLINE. ARPC Section A is a compilation of review articles on inorganic and bioinorganic chemistry. The journal’s editor-in-chief is Sarah Ruthven. Every year, the important research achievements of the prominent research scholars are reviewed...

Annual Reports on the Progress of Chemistry Section A
2012-06-04 18:16:12

Annual Reports on the Progress of Chemistry is a series of three journals covering inorganic, bioinorganic, organic, bioorganic and physical chemistry. All three journals are published annually by the Royal Society of Chemistry and are indexed in MEDLINE. ARPC Section A is a compilation of review articles on inorganic and bioinorganic chemistry. The journal’s editor-in-chief is Sarah Ruthven. Every year, the important research achievements of the prominent research scholars are reviewed...

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Word of the Day
tourtiere
  • a meat pie that is usually eaten at Christmas in Quebec
The word 'tourtiere' comes from the French tourte, or passenger pigeon.
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