Quantcast

Latest Eel life history Stories

Threatened European Eels Disappear In Deep Water On Their Way To The Sargasso Sea
2014-02-11 10:15:02

University of Southern Denmark When the threatened European eels cross the Atlantic Ocean to get to the Sargasso Sea to spawn, they swim in deep water. But this does not protect them from predators, researchers from the University of Southern Denmark report: Even in deep water the eels are hunted and eaten. The European eel is in decline, and all over the world biologists are struggling to map its mysterious life cycle in order to bring its numbers back up. One of the great puzzles is...

Ocean Currents Drive Eel Population Changes: Study
2013-12-29 08:18:16

Ranjini Raghunath for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Fluctuations in the European eel population – a long-time holiday delicacy – may be linked to changing ocean currents in the Atlantic, according to new research published in the journal Current Biology. The European eel gives birth in the Sargasso Sea and the larvae drift towards the European coast 2700 miles away. There, in fresh water and along the coast, they grow and mature into adults, before returning to the Sargasso...

2007-01-23 00:00:12

By David Dishneau HAGERSTOWN, Md. - The Potomac River is being readied for a starring role in the restoration of the American eel to Eastern U.S. waterways. By the end of this year, fishery biologists hope to complete passageways for upstream eel migration around two dams owned by the National Park Service. The proposed eelways would open up 120 miles of "the nation's river" as habitat for eels, which once accounted for a quarter of all aquatic life in the Chesapeake Bay watershed,...

2006-02-22 13:17:26

LONDON (Reuters) - East is East and West is West and never the twain will meet -- at least as far as the world's freshwater eels are concerned. It has long been established that the freshwater eels of the United States and Europe originate in the Sargasso Sea off Bermuda. But the origin of their eastern cousins, the Japanese freshwater eels, has remained a mystery -- until now. Writing in the science journal Nature, researchers from Tokyo University's Ocean Research Institute say...

2005-10-06 07:40:58

BRUSSELS (Reuters) - EU fishermen may have to stop catching eels for six months each year to prevent the species disappearing from European waters after a drastic stock decline over the past 20 years, the EU executive said on Thursday. In June, for the first time, scientists called for a Europe-wide ban on fishing for eels, a species at serious risk of extinction in Europe. Eel numbers have sunk to the lowest since 1980 and could take two decades to rise again, they said. Now, the...


Latest Eel life history Reference Libraries

39_e8f78fd878fc494578bec0c649de9b64
2007-02-21 15:11:58

The American eel, Anguilla rostrata, is a catadromous fish found on the eastern coast of North America. It has a snake-like body with a small sharp pointed head. It is brown on top and a tan-yellow color on the bottom. It has sharp pointed teeth but no pelvic fins. The female American eel spawns in salt water, and it takes 9 to 10 weeks for the eggs to hatch. After hatching, young eels move toward North America and enter freshwater systems to mature. The female can lay up to 4 million...

39_58c0dbce249a1bebbdba1c2ac56d3515
2007-02-21 12:24:55

The European eel, Anguilla anguilla, is a snake-like fish that lives in fresh water and breeds in the sea. It can reach in exceptional cases a length of 4.92 ft (1.5 m), but is normally much smaller, about 2.3 ft (70 cm), and rarely more than 3.28 ft (1 m). They are generally believed to spawn in the Sargasso Sea and the larvae (Leptocephalus) migrate towards Europe in a three-year-long migration. As glass eels they reach the coasts of Europe and enter estuaries. Before entering fresh water,...

More Articles (2 articles) »
Word of the Day
vermicular
  • Like a worm in form or movement; vermiform; tortuous or sinuous; also, writhing or wriggling.
  • Like the track or trace of a worm; appearing as if worm-eaten; vermiculate.
  • Marked with fine, close-set, wavy or tortuous lines of color; vermiculated.
  • A form of rusticated masonry which is so wrought as to appear thickly indented with worm-tracks.
This word ultimately comes from the Latin 'vermis,' worm.
Related