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Latest Eemian Stories

Greenland Ice Core Research Points To Higher Seas, Warmer Past
2013-01-24 11:07:31

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online New research findings based on Greenland ice cores show that if climate change patterns repeat themselves, the Earth will become much warmer and sea levels will rise significantly. In a new report published in the latest edition of the journal Nature, scientists have used Greenland ice cores over 1.5 miles long to collect data on the Eemian period, around 115 to 130 thousand years ago. An analysis of the cores allowed the international...

Eemian Period Is A Poor Analogue For Current Climate Change
2012-06-15 04:34:14

The Eemian interglacial period that began some 125,000 years ago is often used as a model for contemporary climate change. In the international journal “Geophysical Research Letters” scientists from Mainz, Kiel and Potsdam (Germany) now present evidence that the Eemian differed in essential details from modern climatic conditions. Joint press release of the Academy of the Sciences and the Literature Mainz and the GEOMAR | Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel. To address...

2011-06-08 20:43:16

Application deadline is June 20, 2011; deployments to take place between July 12 and July 19, 2011 The National Science Foundation (NSF) is accepting written requests from professional journalists to report on research--including studies of the ice sheet, climate change and atmospheric chemistry--supported in Greenland by NSF's Office of Polar Programs (OPP). OPP and NSF's Office of Legislative and Public Affairs (OLPA) jointly manage and coordinate media visits to the Polar Regions. NSF...

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2010-08-05 08:28:38

International team of climate researchers drill through a mile and half of the Greenland ice sheet in search of climate change insights After years of concentrated effort, scientists from the North Greenland Eemian Ice Drilling (NEEM) project hit bedrock more than 8,300 feet below the surface of the Greenland ice sheet last week. The project has yielded ice core samples that may offer valuable insights into how the world can change during periods of abrupt warming. Led by Denmark and the...

2010-08-03 13:56:33

An international science team involving the University of Colorado at Boulder that is working on the North Greenland Eemian Ice Drilling project hit bedrock July 27 after two summers of work, drilling down more than 1.5 miles in an effort to help assess the risks of abrupt future climate change on Earth. Led by Denmark and the United States, the team recovered ice from the Eemian interglacial period from about 115,000 to 130,000 years ago, a time when temperatures were 3.6 to 5.4 degrees...

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2010-03-02 11:21:55

Researchers evaluate climate fluctuations from 115,000 years ago At the end of the last interglacial epoch, around 115,000 years ago, there were significant climate fluctuations. In Central and Eastern Europe, the slow transition from the Eemian Interglacial to the Weichselian Glacial was marked by a growing instability in vegetation trends with possibly at least two warming events. This is the finding of German and Russian climate researchers who have evaluated geochemical and pollen...

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2009-12-17 06:00:00

Global warming in this century might raise sea levels more than expected in future centuries, says a study that looked at what happened at a time when Neanderthals roamed Europe. Unless global warming is curbed or expensive measures are taken to hold back rising water, the projected sea level rise could submerge about one-third of Florida, southern Manhattan, much of Bangladesh and almost all the Netherlands, for example, researchers said. An expert praised the work but cautioned that such...

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2009-10-20 08:12:07

In 2007 alone, it lost volume equivalent to draining San Francisco Bay every week Not that long ago "“ the blink of a geologic eye "“ global temperatures were so warm that ice on Greenland could have been hard to come by. Today, the largest island in the world is covered with ice 1.6 miles thick. Even so, Greenland has become a hot spot for climate scientists. Why? Because tiny bubbles trapped in the ice layers may help resolve a fundamental question about global warming: how fast...

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2009-09-28 14:35:00

Scientists are taking a more in-depth view of how climate change could affect Antarctica's ice, and how even a small change in temperature could lead to a global rise in sea levels. "If you're going to have even a few meters it will change the geography of the planet," Rajendra Pachauri, head of the U.N.'s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) told Reuters. "Greenland and Antarctica are two huge bodies of ice sitting on land that could really have very serious implications for the...

2009-09-01 14:15:45

An international team of scientists, led by Denmark, says it set a single-season deep ice core drilling record this summer in Greenland. The researchers, with the University of Colorado at Boulder as the lead U.S. institution, recovered more than a mile of ice core that is expected to help scientists better assess the risks of abrupt climate change in the future. The project, known as the North Greenland Eemian Ice Drilling, is being undertaken by 14 nations led by the University of...


Word of the Day
endocarp
  • The hard inner (usually woody) layer of the pericarp of some fruits (as peaches or plums or cherries or olives) that contains the seed.
This word comes from the Greek 'endon,' in, within, plus the Greek 'kardia,' heart.
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