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Latest Effects of passive smoking Stories

2012-04-20 13:34:19

New study presented at the World Congress of Cardiology organized by the World Heart Federation Exercise may help smokers to quit and remain smoke free, according to new data presented today at the World Congress of Cardiology. Moreover, exercise increases life expectancy in smokers and non-smokers alike. The study of 434,190 people who went through medical examination program at a private fee-paying company between 1996 and 2008 in Taiwan revealed that active smokers (those engaged in...

Smokers Experiencing Heart Attacks Earlier
2011-10-11 05:15:51

A new study suggests that smokers suffer heart attacks years before their non-smoking counterparts. Researchers from the University of Michigan Health System in Ann Arbor studied 3,600 people who were hospitalized with a heart attack or unstable angina — pain due to low blood flow to the heart, which is often a precursor to a heart attack. They found that 25 percent of the heart patients were current smokers who were, on average, younger and with fewer health problems than the...

2011-09-05 11:50:20

First national study also analyzes economic impact of household-smoking-related absenteeism Children who live in households where they are exposed to tobacco smoke miss more days of school than do children living in smoke-free homes, a new nationwide study confirms. The report from investigators at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) — which finds these children have higher rates of respiratory illnesses that can be caused by second-hand smoke and details the probable economic costs...

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2011-08-08 08:35:00

That first cigarette of the morning may be the most dangerous one you have all day. A study of 7,610 smokers, published in the journal Cancer, emphasizes the effect was independent of other smoking habits. Cancer Research UK suggested to BBC News that people who are quick to smoke may inhale more smoke into the lungs and which could nearly double the already high risk of lung cancer. Scientists at the Penn State College of Medicine in the US looked at 4,776 smokers with lung cancer and 2,835...

2011-03-10 13:59:36

Pregnant non-smokers who breathe in the second-hand smoke of other people are at an increased risk of delivering stillborn babies or babies with defects, a study led by researchers at The University of Nottingham has found. The study, published in the April edition of the journal Pediatrics, found passive smoking increased the risk of still birth by almost one-quarter (23 per cent) and was linked to a 13 per cent increased risk of congenital birth defects. The findings underline the...

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2010-03-09 13:28:07

Individuals with a certain type of genetic susceptibility to lung cancer face a greatly increased risk for the deadly disease with even a small exposure to cigarette smoke, a study team that includes researchers from the University of Cincinnati (UC) has concluded. For family members who carry this genetic variant, the risk of lung cancer is similar for both light and heavy smokers, the researchers say, adding that even non-smokers who are exposed to second-hand cigarette smoke and have a...

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2009-11-24 06:45:00

According to a new study conducted in the UK, the much debated public smoking ban enacted in 2007 in England, Northern Ireland and Wales has not caused children to be exposed to more second-hand smoke at home "” a result that has largely diffused one of the main arguments raised by critics of the legislation. When discussion of the proposed anti-smoking legislation began, a number of independent organizations "” such as the prominent smokers' rights group Forest "” contended...

2009-08-24 11:11:13

A new study finds that smokers in rural Indonesia finance their habit by dipping into the family food budget"”which ultimately results in poorer nutrition for their children. The findings suggest that the costs of smoking in the developing world go well beyond the immediate health risks, according to authors Steven Block and Patrick Webb of Tufts University.The study is published in the October issue of Economic Development and Cultural Change.Using surveys of 33,000 mostly poor...

2009-03-27 18:22:50

Pregnant women have a 15-week window of opportunity to quit smoking to reduce the risk of spontaneous preterm birth, researchers in New Zealand said. The study, published in the British Medical Journal, found that women who stop smoking before week 15 of pregnancy cut their risk of spontaneous premature birth and having small babies to that of non-smokers. Women who continue smoking past 15 weeks, are three times more likely to give birth prematurely and twice as likely to have small babies...

2009-02-23 16:42:33

People who start smoking before age 17 may increase their risk for developing multiple sclerosis, U.S. researchers said. The study involved 87 people with MS who were among more than 30,000 people in a larger study. The people with MS were divided into three groups: non-smokers, early smokers who began before age 17 and late smokers, who started smoking at age 17 or older. They were matched by age, gender and race to 435 people without MS. Study author Dr. Joseph Finkelstein of Johns Hopkins...