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Targeted Brain Stimulation Helps Stroke Recovery In Mice

Targeted Brain Stimulation Helps Stroke Recovery In Mice

By Bruce Goldman, Stanford University Medical Center When investigators at the Stanford University School of Medicine applied light-driven stimulation to nerve cells in the brains of mice that had suffered strokes several days earlier, the...

Latest Electrical brain stimulation Stories

2014-06-30 14:58:42

Duke University New technique could show transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) treating depression and other disorders Engineers and neuroscientists at Duke University have developed a method to measure the response of an individual neuron to transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) of the brain. The advance will help researchers understand the underlying physiological effects of TMS -- a procedure used to treat psychiatric disorders -- and optimize its use as a therapeutic treatment....

Electrical Brain Stimulation May Help Boost Math Skills
2013-05-17 11:38:35

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online Oxford University researchers in a new study found that a weak electrical signal can help boost a person's mathematic skills over a period few months. The team wrote in the journal Cell Biology that their technique involves placing electrodes on the scalp of the head and applying random electrical noise to stimulate the part of the brain known to be involved in doing math. The technique, known as transcranial random noise...

Researchers Experimenting With Electronic Brain Stimulation Techniques
2012-06-04 03:39:02

Despite the fact that it has been vilified by some in the past, scientists are experimenting with various types of electrical brain stimulation, hoping that some day it will not only be able to treat a wide array of disorders but also enhance a person's cognitive abilities. In a June 2 article, Kerri Smith of the Observer focuses on several different varieties of such treatments, including transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), and deep...

2012-05-01 11:00:05

CCNY Advances Electrical Brain Stimulation to Tap Pain Network Migraine pain sits at the upper end of the typical pain scale — an angry-red section often labeled “severe.” At this intensity, pain is debilitating. Yet many sufferers do not get relief from — or cannot tolerate — over-the-counter and commonly prescribed pain medications. Recently, a team of researchers that includes Dr. Marom Bikson, associate professor of biomedical engineering in CCNY´s...

2011-03-25 11:17:25

Stroke patients who received electrical brain stimulation coupled with swallowing exercises showed greater improvement in swallowing ability than patients who did not receive this stimulation, according to a pilot study reported in Stroke: Journal of the American Heart Association. Difficulty swallowing, known as dysphagia, is a common and serious stroke complication. It can lead to aspiration, when food or foreign matter accidentally enters the lungs causing pneumonia. Aspiration and...

2011-03-24 15:49:00

Study Highlight: -- Non-invasive electrical stimulation to the brain may improve swallowing ability among stroke survivors, which may help avoid life-threatening complications. DALLAS, March 24, 2011 - Stroke patients who received electrical brain stimulation coupled with swallowing exercises showed greater improvement in swallowing ability than patients who did not receive this stimulation, according to a pilot study reported in Stroke: Journal of the American Heart Association. (Logo:...

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2009-03-21 07:45:00

A new study from researchers at Stanford University is providing new insights into how deep-brain stimulation works to treat people who suffer from Parkinson's disease. Researchers found that the largest effect in "Parkinsonian" rodents occurs not by stimulating cells in the subthalamic nucleus, but by stimulating the neural wires, called axons, that connect directly to it from areas closer to the surface of the brain. "Pointing to these axons that converge on the region opens the door to...

2009-01-19 12:13:00

Researchers in Alabama say electronic deep brain stimulation is effective in both older and younger people who have Parkinson's disease. Researchers at the University of Alabama in Birmingham spent six years studying 255 Parkinson's patients, including older patients who had previously been excluded from such research, The Birmingham (Ala.) News reported Monday. Implanting electrodes to stimulate the brain proved significant for a wide range of patients who no longer responded well to...

2009-01-13 13:09:00

Study Says Deep-Brain Stimulation Has Benefits WASHINGTON, Jan. 13 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Electrical stimulation of the brain -- a treatment in which a pacemaker-like device sends pulses to electrodes implanted in the brain -- is riskier than drug therapy but may hold significant benefits for those with Parkinson's disease who no longer respond well to medication alone. That is the conclusion of researchers from the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) and National Institutes of Health...

2006-06-26 10:25:04

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Cell phone emissions excite the part of the brain cortex nearest to the phone, but it is not clear if these effects are harmful, Italian researchers reported on Monday. Their study, published in the Annals of Neurology, adds to a growing body of research about mobile phones, their possible effects on the brain, and whether there is any link to cancer. About 730 million cell phones are expected to be sold this year, according to industry estimates, and nearly 2...


Word of the Day
barratry
  • The offense of persistently instigating lawsuits, typically groundless ones.
  • An unlawful breach of duty on the part of a ship's master or crew resulting in injury to the ship's owner.
  • Sale or purchase of positions in church or state.
This word ultimately comes from the Old French word 'barater,' to cheat.
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