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Last updated on April 21, 2014 at 1:20 EDT

Latest Electrical resistance Stories

Topological Insulators Open a Path to Room-Temperature Spintronics
2012-05-15 07:34:05

Berkeley Lab researchers and their colleagues demonstrate unique new materials for innovative electronic and magnetic applications Strange new materials experimentally identified just a few years ago are now driving research in condensed-matter physics around the world. First theorized and then discovered by researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy´s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) and their colleagues in other institutions, these “strong 3-D topological...

2012-02-12 18:00:00

Resistance Band Training Systems has been named a finalist for 5 Business Excellence Awards at the 2012 Business Excellence Forum. Elizabethtown, KY (PRWEB) February 12, 2012 Known for its resistance band programs, Resistance Band Training Systems (RBT) has been named a Finalist for 5 different Business Excellence Awards. The awards were given out at the Business Excellence Forum, which took place January 13 and 14 in Memphis. The ceremony is put on annually by Action Coach, a business...

2012-01-06 09:49:02

The smallest wires ever developed in silicon - just one atom tall and four atoms wide - have been shown by a team of researchers from the University of New South Wales, Melbourne University and Purdue University to have the same current-carrying capability as copper wires. Experiments and atom-by-atom supercomputer models of the wires have found that the wires maintain a low capacity for resistance despite being more than 20 times thinner than conventional copper wires in microprocessors....

2011-12-07 22:27:21

Findings may impact next-generation handheld devices, solar arrays, and basic science Unexpected voltage increases of up to 25 percent in two barely separated nanowires have been observed at Sandia National Laboratories. Designers of next-generation devices using nanowires to deliver electric currents – including telephones, handheld computers, batteries and certain solar arrays – may need to make allowances for such surprise boosts. "People have been working on nanowires...

2011-10-17 22:03:19

Sophisticated electron-imaging technique reveals widespread "destruction," offering clues to how material works as a superconductor It's a basic technique learned early, maybe even before kindergarten: Pulling things apart - from toy cars to complicated electronic materials - can reveal a lot about how they work. "That's one way physicists study the things that they love; they do it by destroying them," said Séamus Davis, a physicist at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE)...

2011-03-03 01:16:12

Black holes are some of the heaviest objects in the universe. Electrons are some of the lightest. Now physicists at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have shown how charged black holes can be used to model the behavior of interacting electrons in unconventional superconductors. "The context of this problem is high-temperature superconductivity," said Phillips. "One of the great unsolved problems in physics is the origin of superconductivity (a conducting state with zero...

2011-01-20 16:40:55

Electronics researchers love graphene. A two-dimensional sheet of carbon one atom thick, graphene is like a superhighway for electrons, which rocket through the material with 100 times the mobility they have in silicon. But creating graphene-based devices will be challenging, say researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), because new measurements show that layering graphene on a substrate transforms its bustling speedway into steep hills and valleys that make it...

2010-11-15 08:00:00

CLEVELAND, Nov. 15, 2010 /PRNewswire/ -- Keithley Instruments, Inc. (NYSE: KEI), a world leader in advanced electrical test instruments and systems, will broadcast a free, web-based seminar titled "How to Make Electrical Resistivity Measurements of Bulk Materials: Conductors, Insulators, and Semiconductors" on Thursday, November 18, 2010. During this one-hour presentation, participants will learn the fundamentals of making resistivity measurements on bulk materials, as well as the various...

2010-09-21 20:35:20

For months, Anthony West could hardly believe what he and his colleagues were seeing in the lab -- or the only explanation for the unexpected phenomena that seemed to make sense. Several of the slightly doped high-purity barium titanate (BT) ceramics his research group was investigating were not following the venerable Ohm's Law, which relates electrical voltage to current and resistance. Applying or removing a voltage caused a gradual change in the materials' electrical resistance. The new...

2010-05-28 13:57:06

New materials yield clues about high-temperature superconductors A team of U.S. and Chinese physicists are zeroing in on critical effects at the heart of the latest high-temperature superconductors -- but they're using other materials to do it. In new research appearing online today in the journal Physical Review Letters, the Rice University-led team offers new evidence about the quantum features of the latest class of high-temperature superconductors, a family of iron-based compounds called...