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Latest Electroactive polymers Stories

Tough Gel May Help With Replacing Damaged Cartilage In Human Joints
2012-09-05 13:55:42

Biocompatible material created at Harvard is much tougher than cartilage A team of experts in mechanics, materials science, and tissue engineering at Harvard have created an extremely stretchy and tough gel that may pave the way to replacing damaged cartilage in human joints. Called a hydrogel, because its main ingredient is water, the new material is a hybrid of two weak gels that combine to create something much stronger. Not only can this new gel stretch to 21 times its original...

2012-05-02 11:37:07

Researchers from the University of Bristol have created artificial muscles that can be transformed at the flick of a switch to mimic the remarkable camouflaging abilities of organisms such as squid and zebrafish. They demonstrate two individual transforming mechanisms that they believe could be used in 'smart clothing' to trigger camouflaging tricks similar to those seen in nature. The study is published today, 2 May, in IOP Publishing's journal Bioinspiration and Biomimetics, and is...

2012-03-30 10:26:36

It may be difficult to imagine, but pouring juice into a plastic cup can be a great challenge to a robot. While one hand holds the glass bottle firmly, the other one must gently grasp the cup. Researchers at Saarland University together with associates in Bologna and Naples have developed a robotic hand that can accomplish both tasks with ease and yet including the actuators is scarcely larger than a human arm. This was made possible by a novel string actuator, making use of small electric...

2012-02-16 11:02:37

"Perhaps the earliest public demonstration of an electric motor," writes a team of researchers from the University of Auckland in New Zealand, "involved the automatic rotation of a turkey on a spit over a fire" at a party put on by Benjamin Franklin in 1749. Franklin's electrostatic motor was self-commutating, meaning that it was able to provide a continuous torque while it turned without requiring external electronics to control its progress. Using artificial muscles, hyper-elastic materials...

2011-04-06 22:47:42

Battery technology hasn't kept pace with advancements in portable electronics, but the race is on to fix this. One revolutionary concept being pursued by a team of researchers in New Zealand involves creating "wearable energy harvesters" capable of converting movement from humans or found in nature into battery power. A class of variable capacitor generators known as "dielectric elastomer generators" (DEGs) shows great potential for wearable energy harvesting. In fact, researchers at the...

2011-04-04 12:00:00

MENLO PARK, Calif., April 4, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- An article in the January 2011 issue of the journal Science commemorates the anniversary of a smart material technology first described a decade ago in the same publication. In 2000, SRI researchers published a research paper introducing electroactive polymer artificial muscle (EPAM), a unique smart material technology SRI developed. "The 2000 study in Science was the first to report new EPAM materials and configurations with actuator...

2011-01-28 06:26:00

DALLAS, January 28, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- According to a new market research report, 'Global Electroactive Polymers Market (2009 - 2014)', published by MarketsandMarkets (http://www.marketsandmarkets.com), the global electroactive polymers product market is expected to be worth US$2.78 billion by 2014, growing at a CAGR of 8.3% from 2009 to 2014. The North American market is expected to account for nearly 65% of the total revenues. Browse 45 market data tables and in-depth TOC on...

2010-05-15 13:35:00

Composite materials generate electricity, reveal impact forces As athletes strive for perfection, sports scientists need to exploit every technological advance to help them achieve that goal. Researchers in New Zealand have now developed a new type of wearable impact sensor based that can provide much needed information about the stresses and strains on limbs for rugby players, high jumpers, and runners. Writing in the International Journal of Biomechatronics and Biomedical Robotics, Kean Aw...

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2010-04-28 13:06:34

Using neutron beams and atomic-force microscopes, a team of university researchers working with the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) may have resolved a 10-year-old question about an exotic class of "artificial muscles""”how do they work? Their results* could influence the design of future specialized robotic tools. These "artificial muscles," first demonstrated in the early 1990s, are "ionic polymer metal composite" (IPMC) actuators, a thin polymer strip plated on...


Word of the Day
cacodemon
  • An evil spirit; a devil.
  • A nightmare.
  • In astrology, the twelfth house of a scheme or figure of the heavens: so called from its signifying dreadful things, such as secret enemies, great losses, imprisonment, etc.
'Cacodemon' comes from a Greek term meaning 'evil genius.'
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